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No Verizon Partnership For Google's Nexus One

Soulskill posted more than 4 years ago | from the hope-you-weren't-waiting dept.

Businesses 206

starglider29a writes with news that Google and Verizon Wireless have abandoned plans for a partnership that would bring the Nexus One to the carrier's network. "Without a Verizon partnership, Google loses access to the carrier's more than 90 million customers, potentially blocking the phone from gaining more widespread popularity. The breakdown of the deal signals Verizon may view Google as a competitor rather than a partner when it comes to Nexus One sales, which are probably at less than half a million since the phone's January debut, said BGC Partners's Colin Gillis." A Google spokesman said, "We won't be selling a Nexus One with Verizon and this is a reflection of the amazing innovation happening across the open Android ecosystem." In a brief blog post, Google recommends a similar, Android-based phone from HTC for customers who want Verizon service.

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half a million? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988580)

Yep, Android has Apple quaking in its boots.

Re:half a million? (1, Troll)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988692)

Hey, don't laugh. It took Apple almost 75 minutes to reach the milestone of half a million iPhone users.

Re:half a million? (2, Insightful)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988746)

It's one out of dozens of Android phones, each model with it's own features and price ranges.

Steve Jobs has been quaking like a motherfucker (and not in the fun way) if the reports of his Google tantrums are true...

Re:half a million? (1, Interesting)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988836)

Steve Jobs has been quaking like a motherfucker (and not in the fun way) if the reports of his Google tantrums are true...

I don't think it's the competition that caused Jobs's tantrums, it was his feeling of being betrayed by Eric Schmidt, Google's CEO, who sat on Apple's board throughout the development of the iPhone then went on to develop an competing device. Being invited to sit on the BoD of any company is a sign of respect and trust; using knowledge gained from the position to turn around and compete with the company who's board you're sitting on is ethically questionable to say the least. Schmidt didn't break any laws, but what he did does somewhat belie Google's "Don't Be Evil" catchphrase.

Re:half a million? (1)

kg8484 (1755554) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988974)

Schmidt was forced out due to antitrust [wsj.com] concerns.

Re:half a million? (1)

AlexBirch (1137019) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989100)

I didn't see antitrust concerns in the article you posted. Perhaps you meant a different one?
It just reaffirms the parent post.

Re:half a million? (2, Interesting)

kkwst2 (992504) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989258)

You've got to be kidding me. Because he sat on the board in the past he's never allowed to build a competing device? What kind of twisted logic is that? Unless you're drinking the cool-aid enough to believe they violated Apple's IP, which from what I can tell is pretty ridiculous. Do you think he used insider information while on the board to design the product? The Android platform came out several years after iPhone, so I'm not seeing a big advantage here. No evil in my book, at least not for this.

The goal, although you can certainly argue that they haven't achieved it to a significant level with their current devices, is to build a mobile device platform that is more open than existing platforms. I care about that to some degree, but what attracts me much more to the Android platform over Apple (will be coming from WM, not iPhone) is the wider array of hardware options (HW KB, etc.), the ability to exchange the battery, and the ability to exchange memory cards. The battery issue is pretty much a deal-breaker for me, and I know you can get external batteries but that's just not a very good option to me. The memory issue is slightly less of a big deal, but right now, I love being able to carry a tiny micro-SD USB adapter on my key chain such that if I want to quickly get music, pictures, PDF's, etc on my phone, I don't need to have a cable.

Plus, when I'm in the airport, I have a huge issue now finding a plug for my laptop. Why? I'd say 75% of the plugs are taken up by teenagers and twenty-somethings (maybe the occasional old fart) charging their iPhones on layovers, etc. I travel with two spare batteries for my phone, and two for my notebook. The reason I need two notebook batteries is that I can't depend on being able to plug it in anymore. (Obligatory "get off my lawn" comment here, if you wish).

Re:half a million? (2, Insightful)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989580)

You've got to be kidding me. Because he sat on the board in the past he's never allowed to build a competing device?

I wouldn't go that far. However, he was still on the Apple board at the time Google introduced Android.

Re:half a million? (2, Insightful)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989036)

I suggest you look at Apples sales numbers. I dboubt that Jobs is shaking at all.
Planning yes. Shaking I doubt it. It is hard to be terrified when your sales are up and you have Billions in the bank.

Re:half a million? (1)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989126)

Well, I just looked at the numbers [techcrunch.com] . Between 11/2009 and 2/2010 iPhone market share is flat as Kansas. Android market share on the other hand has more than doubled in that period. Hmmm... zero gains vs. more than double gains... yeah if Jobs isn't shaking then he's dumber than I thought.

Re:half a million? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989326)

lol. Let's say in 2008, you had sex with one woman and 50 dudes. In 2009, you had sex with 2 women and 50 dudes. The number of women doubled, but ElectricTurtle is still a faggot.

Re:half a million? (4, Funny)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989586)

Joke's on you, I am actually bisexual, and you are actually a bigot, which is no doubt why you post as an AC to begin with.

The difference between 1-2:50 vs 4.1:11.5 is obvious to anybody with two brain cells to rub together, which explains why it escapes your understanding.

Re:half a million? (1, Insightful)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989170)

bingo. Android marketshare is going way up, and all apple has is hype. Now that they've locked down the codebase, they're slowly bringing the DRM to the masses. Patent infringement lawsuits [pcworld.com] are a sure sign that apple knows they're fucked [techdirt.com] real soon.

Apple is a master of spin, not unlike MS, but when you try to bring policies like the RIAA (restrictions of what you can do with something you purchase) people are eventually going to adapt and just move on altogether.

Re:half a million? (3, Insightful)

node 3 (115640) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989194)

It's one out of dozens of Android phones, each model with it's own features and price ranges.

Steve Jobs has been quaking like a motherfucker (and not in the fun way) if the reports of his Google tantrums are true...

Contrary to common misconception here on Slashdot, iPhone far, far outsells *all* Android handsets combined.

One thing that people often bring up is Android's rate of market share growth, as though this growth is sustainable. The first problem is that such growth is, by its very nature, unsustainable. If it were, there would be trillions of Android phones in no time. The other problem is that few people look into the reason for the growth. With Droid, Nexus One, and Incredible, Android handsets are finally at a point where they are at least somewhat respectable competition for the iPhone in the mass market, so it's natural the number of units being sold would increase at a rate faster than before.

The notion that Apple, or Steve Jobs, are "quaking like a motherfucker" is absurd. iPhone is the leader. And even if Android makes it onto more total phones, the market is fractured, which will still leave Apple in the top spot between Android handsets and iPhone for a long time to come. This is the same dynamic that has Apple as the number four (sometimes number five) PC maker in the US, even with only around an 8% market share. Further, Apple is number one in terms of profits. In other words, HP and Dell would rather trade places with Apple, than the other way round.

In the smart phone market, companies like HTC and Motorola may see increased profits due to increased sales of Android phones, but each and every one of them would similarly trade places with Apple in a heartbeat if they could. If Android is bound to knock Apple off its perch, it's going to take many, many years.

So, do explain why you'd think that anyone in Apple's position would be "quaking"?

Re:half a million? (3, Insightful)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989846)

Huh. iPhone is the leader? I think maybe you should try explaining that to RIM. Their 40+% marketshare might disagree.

Beyond that, you claim the growth is unsustainable. This is a relatively new and evolving market segment. A lot of share has been ceded to Google by MS and Palm, but so far only 'potential' share has come off of RIM and Apple. You think it's impossible for them to lose any ground? They can grow forever but Google can't even keep growing through the end of the year? I sense bias.

Oh and the Apple profits that you vaunt are a direct result of gouging the consumer. Margins like that can't proceed from high quality hardware. Apple sells mediocre crap and an image brand for heinous markup. Only so many people will be duped by that, which is why Apple has a completely flat line of market share in the computing world. They've been at 'around an 8% market share' for years .

Re:half a million? (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989868)

That's a good counter argument, but nothing more. In summary: Apple is #1, android is gaining. Apple recognises it has competition, its negative statements about the android market reflect that. If you want to characterise that as quaking or not is a semantic argument best left to marketing types.

Now, what will the future hold? I don't know. You don't know. Apple and Google doesn't know. If you tried arguing with some one back in 1991 that Apple was going to end up on the brink of bankruptcy in six years and would have to rely on Microsoft to prop them up ( due to MS's dominance based on a crappy, buggy operating system that crashed more often than it worked) you'd have called me crazy. Leave the far off predictions to the insane I say. Choose what seems best for you over the short term, with disposable products like cell phones.

Re:half a million? (1)

DJLuc1d (1010987) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989916)

That is misleading when you say

This is the same dynamic that has Apple as the number four (sometimes number five) PC maker in the US, even with only around an 8% market share. Further, Apple is number one in terms of profits. In other words, HP and Dell would rather trade places with Apple, than the other way round.

as it implies that a majority of apples profits are from the PC which as anyone knows is completely off base. Apple would have gone off and died in the early 2000s if not for the iPod, and would be losing money today. In fact, according to apple's most recent (Q2) earnings report, http://images.apple.com/pr/pdf/q210data_sum.pdf [apple.com] Apple makes only 27% off of it's PC sales. So comparing a computer OEM manufacturer to Apple is like comparing Apples and Jupiter (Pardon the pun.) As far as being the number 1 profitable company, I would like to see the data that backs that up. http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2010/04/20results.html [apple.com] indicates 15B in sales, yet after expenses, net profit is only 3B (20% profit.) Microsoft hands down CRUSHES apple in that front http://www.microsoft.com/msft/earnings/fy10/earn_rel_q2_10.mspx#income [microsoft.com] with 19B in revenue and 6.6B in net profit (34% profit). I'm no fan of MS, simply because they are so closed and..... anti-consumer..... wait.... that sounds like another tech giant.

Re:half a million? (1)

Bakkster (1529253) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988786)

Yep, Android has Apple quaking in its boots.

The Nexus one alone might not, but there are multiple other Android phones each with over a million sales. And, since you can get an Android phone for nearly every carrier, Google is capitalizing on a market that Apple is leaving behind.

Apple has (for all intents and purposes) one phone on one carrier. Google has many phones at various price points on many carriers. There's a big Android phone release more frequently than an iPhone release, meaning users are more likely to find one they want. Also, Android (overall) sales may eclipse iPhone in the next 2 years [cnet.com] .

Yes, they probably should worry.

Re:half a million? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988816)

Apple should probably worry, but why are the fanboys worrying and getting all defensive? Oh right, they're fanboys.

Re:half a million? (3, Insightful)

jabithew (1340853) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988932)

Apple has (for all intents and purposes) one phone on one carrier.

Some of us [tesco.com] live [o2.co.uk] in [vodafone.co.uk] Europe [orange.co.uk] , you insensitive clod!

Re:half a million? (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989154)

Apple has (for all intents and purposes) one phone on one carrier.

You do realize that the US isn't the entire world, right?

Re:half a million? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989176)

Yeah, there are other parts where we bomb...

Re:half a million? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989224)

Yep, Android has Apple quaking in its boots.

The Nexus one alone might not, but there are multiple other Android phones each with over a million sales. And, since you can get an Android phone for nearly every carrier, Google is capitalizing on a market that Apple is leaving behind.

Apple has (for all intents and purposes) one phone on one carrier. Google has many phones at various price points on many carriers. There's a big Android phone release more frequently than an iPhone release, meaning users are more likely to find one they want. Also, Android (overall) sales may eclipse iPhone in the next 2 years [cnet.com] .

Yes, they probably should worry.

It's the same thing microsoft did to apple in the PC market.

Re:half a million? (1)

node 3 (115640) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989276)

Google has many phones at various price points on many carriers.

Google has one phone, sort of.

Also, Android (overall) sales may eclipse iPhone in the next 2 years.

Markets don't work like that. You can't just follow a trend line, then extend it two years into the future.

Re:half a million? (0, Troll)

Renderer of Evil (604742) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989460)

Let me break this genty to you.

Google makes jack shit from Android "sales" because it's a free operating system. Even if there are 10 billion Android phones out there, ultimately the deciding factor is the quality of the apps, developer mindshare, and broad consumer acceptance.

Keep in mind, Android is not a phone. It's an operating system. In a greater scheme of things, consumers aren't buying Android. They're buying a Verizon smartphone or Motorola smartphone with their respective brands. So to say that "Android grew X % over Y period of time" is not really helpful for any meaningful metric.

iPhone is still the leader and will continue to be unless a strong competitor emerges out of the bunch and presents a unified front where they can clearly differentiate between devices.

Re:half a million? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988918)

Yep, Android has Apple quaking in its boots.

There's more than one phone out there that does Android. From the article:

Google and its partners probably sold 6.8 million Android devices last year, accounting for 3.9 percent of worldwide smartphone sales, according to Gartner.

I know - that's not quite there with Apple's numbers. Gartner claims the iPhone is doing in the neighborhood of 24.9 million (14.4%). Of course - none of that touches Symbian's 80.9mil 46.9% share.

Open? (1)

Slash.Poop (1088395) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988582)

"We won't be selling a Nexus One with Verizon and this is a reflection of the amazing innovation happening across the open Android ecosystem.

But not TOO open apparently.

Re:Open? (2, Insightful)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988762)

Let's keep in mind that Google is pushing the Android platform. The Nexus One phones are just a part of that push. Of course they want to sell a lot of Nexus One's (and reap the cash rewards of that success), but they'd rather see a Verizon Moto Droid be sold than an iPhone.

A big flop (3, Insightful)

calibre-not-output (1736770) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988588)

Google's idea was great, but it doesn't work in the current carrier-controlled (and I don't mean this in a conspiracy-theorist way) market. The phone is just too expensive up front to compare with carrier-sponsored models that get their price dilluted into your monthly service payments.

Re:A big flop (1)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988788)

That is why they should have started selling it in Europe first!

Re:A big flop (2, Informative)

TemporalBeing (803363) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988846)

Google's idea was great, but it doesn't work in the current carrier-controlled (and I don't mean this in a conspiracy-theorist way) market. The phone is just too expensive up front to compare with carrier-sponsored models that get their price dilluted into your monthly service payments.

Their price isn't really that diluted. AT&T for example requires all phones with a full keyboard or that are otherwise considered a smart phone (e.g. iPhone, NexusOne, etc.) to have a data plan. You may be paying $199 for that iPhone up front, but you'll also be paying $30/month for 2 years. Now some phones you can cancel the data plan, but when varies from phone to phone. iPhone requires it at all times (so 2 years, 3 * 24 - $720 later). Some may be as little as 6 months, and may only require the $5/month texting plan (still a minimum of $30) but they're not going to nicely tell you or document your options on that front.

That said, I just ordered my Nexus One at full price ($529), and don't plan on adding any data plan whatsoever. AT&T will be not be informed I have a smart phone, and I have no intention of using the cell service for Internet. Wi-fi is good enough for me.

Re:A big flop (1)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988864)

The whole practice of tying phone subsidies to service contracts needs to end. It should be illegal across the board. It gives far too much control over the network and innovation to a few very large companies and really makes it a lot more difficult for new handset manufacturers to enter the market.

From a consumer fairness perspective, it's a win here also. Right now, carriers do not give you a discount if you provide the handset. They charge the same, whether they give you a branded phone for $30 or you provide your own $500 phone.

If carriers were required to offer discounts for providing your own phone at least, you'd see some quick changes in the way they sell them.

Re:A big flop (1)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988964)

It should be illegal?

I'd rather the government not control business that much.

Google and T-Mobile are offering an altnerative model here where you pay full price for the phone, and then get a discount on your phone plan since you're not paying to subsidize the cost of the phone. If T-Mobile's network didn't suck so much, I'd be interested.

Verizon is passing on the Nexus, not because it is a bad phone, but rather because they don't want to open the door to this new business model. For instance, what happens to every customer (like my parents for example) that keep their phones longer than 2 years. Would their plans suddenly have to come down in price once they were no longer subdizing the cost of a phone?

Verizon wants no part of that. I can understand why consumers are upset. But let consumers vote with their wallets rather that over-regulate with Congress.

Re:A big flop (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989780)

Verizon wants no part of [service plan discounts for bringing your own phone]. I can understand why consumers are upset. But let consumers vote with their wallets rather that over-regulate with Congress.

Congress is already regulating by allocating spectrum through the FCC.

Re:A big flop (1)

shimage (954282) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988878)

Google's idea is stupid because the costs aren't just up front. If you buy the AT&T Nexus One, then you will pay the same service rates as everyone else. Basically, you will be subsidizing everyone else's phones. If you must have a Nexus One, that is fine, but I myself find it difficult to justify the astronomical cost compared to similar devices. If the service plans sans contract were less, then I'd have some incentive to buy the Nexus One, or even to hold onto my old phone. But since I'm going to end up paying the same amount anyway, I sign the contract and get a new phone for free every 2 years instead.

Re:A big flop (3, Informative)

Enderandrew (866215) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988986)

That's not Google's idea. That is AT&T's idea.

If you buy a Nexus One and sign up with T-Mobile, you get a discount on your monthly rate since you're not subsidizing a phone.

Re:A big flop (1)

shimage (954282) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989820)

It was Google's idea to release the Nexus One, and that idea is stupid because only T-Mobile discounts rates.

Re:A big flop (1)

corexian (828038) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989562)

The real benefit with an unlocked phone is not having to startup a new contract just because you want another phone. If you're already paying for the smart phone plan, you should be able to pick up whatever phone you want as long as it works with that network. Freeing the device from the carrier would probably be one of the best things for the market and for customers as it promotes consumer freedom and market innovation, competition, and hopefully standards.

Re:A big flop (2, Informative)

Atmchicago (555403) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988890)

I'm not sure it was a flop. Did Google make money on it? Did they get new customers onto the Android bandwagon?

Then, there's the other perspective. I just got one, my dad got one, and my brother is considering one too. It's cheaper over the lifetime of a 2-year contract than a subsidized phone. I'm not tied into a contract with T-mobile, and the price is reasonable. The phone works well and synchs with my google contacts, mail, calendar... And if I want, I can change phones whenever I feel like upgrading. Heck, it even plays Ogg Vorbis! For me, at least, it's a great success.

Any other carriers with a BYOP discount? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989844)

I'm not tied into a contract with T-mobile

What other carrier does your phone work on? Are there any carriers operating in the U.S. other than T-Mobile that offer a discount for bringing your own handset? You're just less tied to T-Mobile.

Re:A big flop (1)

Some1too (1242900) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988936)

Not sure how you're defining a big flop. Just by having google and android hand in hand the branding is getting out there. HTC devices are now known to be reliable by the consumer. For the record I own one and bought it new with an extra battery (you can't go wrong for 25$). I bought it when it was still unavailable in my country of origin. I don't use a dataplan but connect via wifi. I'd rather know the cost of my device upfront and have the ability to change carriers whenever I feel like it rather than being locked into one carrier for two to three years. Until our carriers monthly service plans fall to a resonable monthly cost (under 30$ a month) i will not support them any more than I need to. Android, HTC, google, the open source movement and the consumer are all winning with this thing. Not really understanding how this is a loss or flop. S.

Re:A big flop (4, Insightful)

astrashe (7452) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988938)

The problem is that you don't get the advantage of having an unlocked phone, which ought to be portability.

The ideal situation for me would be a world in which I buy my phone, and sign up for monthly service with my carrier. If the carrier sucks, I can cancel my service and go to another one without paying any penalties.

That doesn't work for lots of reasons. Some of those reasons seem to be policies that deliberately create lock-in (termination fees, even if you buy a phone for $579!), and other reasons seem to be reasonable technical realities (T-Mobile and Sprint use different kinds of networks).

The government has imposed number portability on the carriers, and that works well when your contract is up. But we still live in this 2 year contract/carrier subsidized phones/early termination fees universe.

I get dropped calls on my iPhone every day, too. And it would cost me a fortune to leave.

Re:A big flop (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989190)

Don't you mean "The ideal situation for me would be a country in which I ... But we still live in this 2 year contract/carrier subsidized phones/early termination fees country."?

Immigration (2, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989866)

Switching to a different country is far more difficult than switching to a different U.S. wireless carrier.

Re:A big flop (1)

Silentknyght (1042778) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988992)

A real-world example to support your "a big flop" argument:

My wife & I were shopping for smartphones and it came down to the Nexus One vs. the Motorola Droid. We already had T-Mobile service. Using the discount for new members and the cheapest two-year data+phone contract T-Mobile offered, the total two-year amount was cheaper than if I had purchased the unlocked phones and used T-Mobile's month-to-month plan for 2 years. Of course, we were ineligible for the new customer price, and T-Mobile could/would do nothing for us since it was partnered with Google (or, at least, that was the direction of the finger-pointing). There was no impetus to stay with T-Mobile. (We were able to get the Motorola Droid as a buy-one-get-one deal with Verizon). If you can't recoup the value of an unlocked phone in 2 years, then I fail to see the reason to get one: you can port your number to a new carrier, get a new phone, and pay less all at the same time.

Some other considerations regarding unlocked phones on the US carrier-controlled network with the Nexus one: I have read that while T-Mobile is 3G, it's not the same frequency as other 3G. This, as I was told, meant that an unlocked Nexus One for T-Mobile would not be able to use 3G for other carriers. Of course, the Motorola Droid was similarly "locked-in" with CDMA, but that factoid really undermined what I understood to be a significant advantage of the "unlocked phone".

Re:A big flop (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989332)

You are wrong. T-Mobile's no contract plan is $20/mo CHEAPER than the contract option, in the case of a single line. I haven't looked at the family share plans, but for 500 minutes + text+data, it is $60 vs $80. That would be $480 saved over 2 years. That more than makes up for the extra 150-200 you have to pay for a CLIQ, and it even more than makes up for the extra $350 you would have to pay for a Nexus One.

Re:A big flop (1)

mspohr (589790) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989900)

Yes, you're right. Google should have done something like partner with a carrier such as T-Mobile to offer a subsidized phone for $179 along with a two year contract at a high enough price to recoup the subsidy for the phone... oh wait!... you mean that they did do this?

No shock there... (4, Insightful)

nweaver (113078) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988590)

The HTC Droid Incredible has a better reputation anyway: its faster, and has HTC's UI enhancements not present on the HTC Nexus One...

So why should Google put its name directly on an inferior phone through Verizon when there is a better HTC phone available soon on Verizon's network?

Re:No shock there... (3, Insightful)

spikeb (966663) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988600)

not to mention, there is already a kickass android phone on verizon's network: the motorola droid

Re:No shock there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988670)

The Droid pales in comparison to the Nexus in a great number of technical ways while the Nexus lacks a keyboard. This may be part of the competition mentioned.

Re:No shock there... (5, Informative)

ircmaxell (1117387) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988796)

Can you please enlighten me as to the great number of technical ways the Nexus is better? A better screen? Oh wait, no, that goes to the Droid. Better touch screen interface? Nope, the Nexus has be notorious with its issues [engadget.com] ... A GPU? Oh no, that's the Droid too. Better 3g connectivity? Oh wait, isn't the Nexus 1 having major 3G issues [engadget.com] ? Better WiFi? Oh wait, no, the Nexus 1 never actually got 802.11n... Battery Life? Kinda, the Nexus has 30 minutes more talk time, but the Droid has 20 hours more standby. Price? Oh no, that's right, you can find the Droid for $99... Oh I know, Android 2.1? Nope...

There are only 2 things that you can argue that the Nexus is better than the Droid at. CPU speed, and Network. In every other realm, they are at best tied and at worst the Droid edges out the winner...

Re:No shock there... (1)

FlyingBishop (1293238) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988972)

CPU is questionable given the GPU differences. Nexus may have hopped on the Snapdragon bandwagon a little too soon for it to give a ton of benefit over the Droid.

It's also worth noting the Droid is intentionally underclocked like most of the iPhones. For a mobile device, it seems like the natural state of being is to underclock the processor for battery savings.

Re:No shock there... (1, Interesting)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988998)

Oh wait, no, the Nexus 1 never actually got 802.11n

Oh, you unenlightened person. N1 actually has the 802.11n chip inside it. It connects to 802.11n routers using 802.11n but only over 2.4GHz frequency. Still mine gets 150mbps router to phone. Was that news for you?

Price? Oh no, that's right, you can find the Droid for $99...

Oh you poor brainwashed person, do you really think that the carriers actually sell it to you at $99? Noooo.... They sell it to you at something over $2000. Once you calculate the TCO of the damn device.

Re:No shock there... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989108)

Oh you poor brainwashed person, do you really think that the carriers actually sell it to you at $99? Noooo.... They sell it to you at something over $2000. Once you calculate the TCO of the damn device.

Please explain to me how the TCO of the Nexus winds up lower when you have a higher initial purchase price for the handheld and pay the same monthly fees as a Droid/Incredible/~insert favorite non-Nexus Android device here~.

Re:No shock there... (1)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989408)

If you drop carriers more than 3 times over the lifetime of the phone, it should start to work out in favor of the Nexus.

Re:No shock there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989512)

If you drop carriers more than 3 times over the lifetime of the phone, it should start to work out in favor of the Nexus.

Hmm... OK, not something I have ever done or could see myself doing but I suppose this might represent a small portion of the smartphone buying public.

Re:No shock there... (1)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989178)

You could have just as easily written that without the snark, especially given that you had a few decent points in there.

Re:No shock there... (1)

ckaminski (82854) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989060)

If the Droid is the best the mobile handset market has to pit against the iPhone, I'm convinced it'll die as soon as Apple dislodges AT&T from it's bloated teat and opens the phone to other networks.

I have a Droid because I need tethering over texting accuracy, and I need service reliability over ease-of-smartphone use. The Droid is good, but it's not polished. Not in a way the iPhone is. And 90% of the Market reviews are spam. Android has potential, but I miss the polish of the iPhone I had for a month, but had to give back because of poor reception.

 

Re:No shock there... (1)

Slashdot Parent (995749) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989338)

I found iPhone 3Gs to be sluggish and painful to use, as compared side-by-side with the Nexus One on the same network. Once iPhone gets multitasking, it'll be a lot better.

No doubt Android needs more polish to get to where iPhone OS and WebOS are, but I'd take a small learning curve over lacking functionality, any day.

Droid is a nice device, but I don't like the keyboard. I have a personal preference for the Pre Plus.

It'll be nice to have some choices when the Incredible and the Evo 4G come out.

Re:No shock there... (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989402)

Even more telling: Old droid was from motorola. New droid is from HTC. Motorola put all their chips on the droid. buh-bye!!!

Re:No shock there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988684)

Is HTC's UI really a plus? I didn't try it, but I think I trust google more than HTC (or motorola) to design an interface and support it for the future with updates.

Re:No shock there... (1)

ircmaxell (1117387) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988726)

...and support it for the future with updates.

That's the ticket here. The more manufacturers customize the OS, the slower and harder it will be to update to newer versions. It's a whole other layer that needs to be tested/redesigned. Right now, when the Droid gets updated, the only thing that really needs testing is the drivers. But with the Sense UI, the whole UI layer may break, so it requires significant developer time to adjust to the new OS. What this means for the end users is that instead of getting the latest upgrade 3 to 6 months after release, they'll be getting it 1 to 2 years after release (IF they decide to do it at all)... And people complain about fragmentation...

Re:No shock there... (3, Interesting)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988748)

Is HTC's UI really a plus? I didn't try it, but I think I trust google more than HTC (or motorola) to design an interface and support it for the future with updates.

HTC's interface is, surprisingly, much more fluid than Google's. A Droid Incredible (in my limited time with one) feels as smooth as an iPhone. The N1 doesn't...DROID DOES>?!

Re:No shock there... (1)

drachenstern (160456) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988910)

Apparently you've not used an HTC (re)designed interface for a mobile phone.

Yeah, they have a concept of what it means to really use a phone, most days.

Re:No shock there... (1)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988824)

I don't think its any faster - its the same exact hardware (different display I'm told).

Re:No shock there... (2, Insightful)

peragrin (659227) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988870)

That is the single problem with Android phones.

There is no consistent user Interface. HTC has one Interface, motoraola another, Google yet a third. how can droid hope to compete with the iphone if users can't expect the same interface on all models?

let alone some models have horrible interfaces which will put end users off on the entire line. you use a motorola droid and hate it. you will think twice about picking up an HTC android model even though the HTC is superior.

Re:No shock there... (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989114)

How the hell will things ever improve if no one does anything different? Standardisation is not the answer to everything. If a company thinks they can change something to improve the interface, I'm all for it. It's software Darwinism, with users playing the part of nature.

Re:No shock there... (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989160)

how can droid hope to compete with the iphone if users can't expect the same interface on all models?

Why would users be bothered? It's not like they walk around juggling several phones. You usually have and use one at a time.

Re:No shock there... (1)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989222)

how can droid hope to compete with the iphone if users can't expect the same interface on all models?

lol, wut? Because people are going to buy and use three phones simultaneously? Having different interfaces is better because it allows people to choose one that they find most comfortable. They're only going to be using that one interface for the entire time they have that phone. I don't see how that's complex. Yeah, went they want a new phone months/years down the line, then they might have to think about a different interface. Big deal.

Re:No shock there... (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989248)

then why do so many people switch windows aero interface back to the windows classic? Why do so many people make linux look like windows?

if it isn't a big deal then why go through all that effort?

Re:No shock there... (3, Insightful)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989328)

And what you're describing is choice. Some people like classic interfaces, some people like new interfaces, but where Windows and Linux give people varying degrees of control over the interface, Apple gives you practically no control.

What choice do you have with the iPhone? None.
What choice do you get with Android phones? Several different interfaces.

Re:No shock there... (1)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989642)

Its more like a reskinned ui - at least between HTC and Google's stock UI. The both operate very similarly.

Re:No shock there... (1)

lucian1900 (1698922) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988952)

Except no one in their right mind wants Sense UI. Pretty much every single other phone (except the CLIQ) has a vanilla Android. Get a Droid.

Re:No shock there... (1)

AndrewNeo (979708) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989302)

Or turn it off, because, you can, you know.

Re:No shock there... (2, Insightful)

Trifthen (40989) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989416)

The problem with having a vendor-added enhancement like SenseUI is that it's vendor added. Any enhancements to Android have to be filtered through the vendor before you'll see the upgrade. Unfortunately, they're always developing new phones, moving on to bigger and better things, and may abandon or at least only pay partial attention to the phone you love. The Incredible is "The Shit" now, but what about when Android 2.2 comes out? What about 2.3? If HTC decides to call it a day, you're stuck with no recourse but to maybe do a firmware hack and hope for the best.

The major benefit in the Nexus One, is that it's just Android, straight from the lion's mouth. Provided Google doesn't get all crazy dropping backwards compatibility, you could keep upgrading the firmware almost indefinitely because you don't have to wait for the manufacturer or vendor to port all of their tweaks to the new version.

It's OK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988696)

Google doesn't need to make big numbers on the Nexus One. It was a product made to up the bar, and set things moving in the Android ecosystem. II'm sure they are delighted for the success of the Motorola Droid, for example, and for what HTC has been able to pull off with his Sens UI. Giving the number of Androids device arrived and arriving on the market, I would say they have done right!

Google (2, Insightful)

C_Kode (102755) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988716)

What does Google think the Nexus One is it's version of the iPhone? I own a Nexus One and I love the device, but Google is being morons the way they are holding onto it. I should be able to call my carrier for support, especially since Google is absolutely clueless on how to give customer support.

Re:Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988776)

is being morons

oh, sweet irony.

Re:Google (2, Funny)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988794)

Why for are you beings a so mean?

I think you mean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989062)

Why for are you beings a so mean?

Wherefore

Re:Google (1)

ProdigyPuNk (614140) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988802)

What does Google think the Nexus One is it's version of the iPhone? I own a Nexus One and I love the device, but Google is being morons the way they are holding onto it. I should be able to call my carrier for support, especially since Google is absolutely clueless on how to give customer support.

I'm personally glad that Google is "holding onto it" like they are. The sooner we get away from a carrier-controlled phone market the better. Phone prices might go up a little, but we subsidize their purchase through our bills anyway. Good for Google.

Great! (4, Insightful)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988894)

Great!
Basically they are reaffirming that Android is not to become a "hegemony". Google is there to provide only visionary products to push the manufacturers.

Google's Purpose with the Nexus One (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988904)

The Nexus One is not intended to be a phone for the masses. It was made as a proof of concept for the Android OS. It's purpose is to act as a standard reference point. Remember how over the last 2 years, every phone has been compared with the iPhone? Google's goal is to get everyone to compare new phones to the Nexus one. It is Google's goal for all Android phones to be AT LEAST AS GOOD as the Nexus One--the idea being that, "since the Nexus One is good, so this new Android phone must be great!" After a year, when all the Android phones get to be a little too good, Google will develop the Nexus Two, or whatever they plan to call it, which will act as the new reference point.

So NO. Verizon will not get the Nexus One. The Droid Incredible is better anyway, and Google is getting their OS out in the wild.

Re:Google's Purpose with the Nexus One (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989208)

After a year, when all the Android phones get to be a little too good, Google will develop the Nexus Two, or whatever they plan to call it, which will act as the new reference point.

I'm waiting for the Nexus Six pleasure model, personally.

Re:Google's Purpose with the Nexus One (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989394)

Yeah well, we'll see if it can put a dent in the iWhore's market share.

Re:Google's Purpose with the Nexus One (1)

LordBmore (1794002) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989722)

You make an excellent point. HTC manufactured the Nexus One that Google had designed and then just went ahead and improved on that design with the Droid Incredible. Google just wants to build Android market share; they don't really care about the hardware. But I'm not sure this is a wise decision. The Google brand is very powerful and could push alot of phones to the average Verizon customer that doesn't know the difference between Android and any other OS.

Perhaps the Verizon/iPhone rumors are true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31988906)

If Verizon do have a deal with Apple for the next gen iPhone, then they wouldn't need Android - would they?

Shhh.....don't look now...... (3, Interesting)

Darth_brooks (180756) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988916)

You know, there is another CDMA based major network carrier out there for the nexus one. One that doesn't care about using forcible sodomy to invoke tethering charges. One that could really stand to make a splash in the handset market, since the Palm Pre hasn't exactly set the world on fire.

Can we maybe mention Sprint [google.com] (and their current begging for a jumpstart stock price as the link shows) as a player? Sure, their network is closer to AT&T's that Verizon's in terms of quality (or lack thereof), but they're still alive and kicking. As a former Sprint customer, I can say with certainty that they're network is utter shit. However, if Verizon gets too complacent, they could well be staring down competition from a company that will gladly whore itself out to any handset maker that can give them back even a sliver of market share.

Re:Shhh.....don't look now...... (3, Insightful)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989088)

As a former Sprint customer, I can say with certainty that they're network is utter shit.

You say SAY that all you want, but it just means you don't know what you're talking about. Network quality depends MIGHTILY upon where you are. In some places, Sprint is the best, in some, the worst. The exact same can be said of the other big three in the U.S. I went from Verizon to Sprint and my call quality went up, and I've never had a dropped call since, although that also depends partly on the handset you're using.

Re:Shhh.....don't look now...... (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989578)

While I think you're right, I've yet to find a location where ATT is the best. Frustrates the hell out of me since my work phone got moved to ATT from Sprint. So I keep my personal cell with Sprint and everywhere I go I can make calls reliably. Sure data services aren't as good but I handle that with wifi in most places and Sprint's data has improved dramatically over the last couple of years. I can't stand ATT, I should at least be able to complete a call but I drop everyday with them. To be specific, I use ATT regularly in Vermont, Florida, Arizona, and California as I spend roughly a month in each place every year.

Re:Shhh.....don't look now...... (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989632)

>> In some places, Sprint is the best, in some, the worst. The exact same can be said of the other big three in the U.S.

> While I think you're right, I've yet to find a location where ATT is the best.

Okay, AT&T may be the exception. :)

Re:Shhh.....don't look now...... (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989346)

Sprint's already launching the EVO 4G [engadget.com] , which should outdo the Nexus One.

This is why.... (3, Informative)

lord_mike (567148) | more than 4 years ago | (#31988988)

...the iPhone is still not on Verizon, nor is it likely to be in the near future. Verizon, like Apple, is all about control. Verizon didn't like that Google wanted too much control over the Nexus One, so they canned it. Verizon initially didn't like Apple's terms for the iPhone, so they nixed that. Their position is unlikely to change anytime soon. Apple is going to want a king's ransom for the iPhone to be on Verizon, and Verizon will simply point to their increasingly successful Android lineup and tell Apple to try again next time.

This is a PR blow for Google, but a small one. Verizon is the leading carrier for Android phones, and the Droid Incridible is quite an impressive flagship device, just as the Motorola Droid was last year. Since HTC manufactures both the Nexus One and the Incredible, the deal failing is no skin off their back. Either way google wins, 'cos more Android smartphones will be sold either way.

Re:This is why.... (1)

toriver (11308) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989318)

Yeah, because AT&T is not at all about control [androidguys.com] . A phone is as open as the phone company lets it be.

Re:This is why.... (1)

SideshowBob (82333) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989398)

"Either way google wins, 'cos more Android smartphones will be sold either way."

What does Google "win" from this?

I don't mean in the fanboy sense. I mean in the bottom line sense, what does Google get that they wouldn't get from an [iPhone, Blackberry, Nokia] smartphone?

Re:This is why.... (2, Insightful)

gyrogeerloose (849181) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989720)

...the iPhone is still not on Verizon, nor is it likely to be in the near future. Verizon, like Apple, is all about control.

Of course, it has nothing to do with the fact that Verizon does not have a GSM network, meaning that Apple would have had to build two different models of iPhone--one for the US market and one for the rest of the world--and that iPhone users couldn't use their phones internationally if they chose. No, it must all be about control...

I don't give a shit (0, Flamebait)

Weezul (52464) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989150)

I got mine, a Nokia N900 that is, screw the droids. Real VoIP & IM integration rocks!

I also have a U.S. passport, even got some entry stamps. So fuck all the worthless CDMA carriers like Verizon too. I prefer that my phone has some coverage within 1000 miles.

p.s. Android should never have been developed. Google could have improved everyones lives by enhancing the Maemo project.

Re:I don't give a shit (1)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989768)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJpEuMidcSU [youtube.com] - yes I know the N900 doesn't run Symbian, but the N97 has taught me a really important lesson about Nokia - never buy another Nokia for as long as I live.

This means the Nexus One is a success (1)

wangmaster (760932) | more than 4 years ago | (#31989424)

I'm not certain Google ever truly wanted to be in the phone market. It makes sense for google to want a reference platform for their employees, for developers and to spur the market for the android PLATFORM (this is the key). But Google really isn't a hardware vendor.

When the Nexus One was released, the motorola droid wasn't out yet, the closest competitor to the iPhone on android was the mytouch 3g and HTC hero on sprint (i'm referring to US market not european market).

I don't know if the Nexus One actually accelerated any plans, or what, but now, there's a whole bunch of decent android phones that can actually compete with the iPhone.

Google doesn't need the Nexus One on verizon, and likely doesn't want it. The Droid, Droid Eris and Droid Incredible are all much better suited for the purpose because Verizon supports the phones fully, sells the phones and they are all excellent Android experience phones.

I wouldn't be surprised if the Nexus One for Sprint never materializes either, since the Evo 4G is not that far out.

Google doesn't need to sell the Nexus One everywhere for it to be a success. They just need android to be a viable platform on all of the major wireless providers, and it's definitely shaping up to be that way now.

More than just phone sales (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#31989766)

Let's not forget that these two companies compete and bicker in areas beyond phone sales. They've both been vocal advocates on opposite sides of the net neutrality debate as well as offering some competing services. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/06/AR2006020601624.html

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