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RIM Attracts 15,000 Apps For BlackBerry 10 In 2 Days

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the pay-enough-you'll-get-all-you-want dept.

Blackberry 193

CWmike writes "It's starting to look like the BlackBerry store will be well stocked with apps when Research In Motion launches BlackBerry 10 (see YouTube preview) at the end of this month. The company held an event over the weekend where it offered app developers incentives to port their programs to the BlackBerry 10 platform and managed to attract 15,000 app submissions. 'Well there you have it. 37.5 hours in, we hit 15,000 apps for this portathon. Feel like I've run a marathon. Thanks to all the devs!' wrote Alec Saunders, vice president of developer relations at RIM, in a Twitter message. The 'port-a-thon' event was held in two parts: One aimed at Android developers and the other at apps written in other platforms, including Appcelerator, Maramalade, Sencha, jQuery, PhoneGap and Qt. RIM was offering $100 for each app ported and subsequently approved for sale in the BlackBerry 10 app store, up to certain limits. Developers could also win BlackBerry 10 development handsets and a trip to RIM's BlackBerry Jam Europe developer event." It's hard to believe that many current iOS or Android users are leaping toward Blackberry, though. If you're in one of those camps, is that so crazy?

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The question is... (4, Insightful)

GerbilSoft (761537) | about 2 years ago | (#42594211)

How many of those 15,000 "apps" are actually useful, and how many are just worthless single-site frontends?

Re:The question is... (5, Insightful)

6Yankee (597075) | about 2 years ago | (#42594329)

5,000 single-site frontends and 10,000 fart apps.

Re:The question is... (0)

outofluck70 (1734164) | about 2 years ago | (#42595689)

Doesn't the Apple store count a book as an "app"?

Re:The question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594359)

... compared to iOS?

Re:The question is... (3, Insightful)

GerbilSoft (761537) | about 2 years ago | (#42594747)

iOS has the same problem, as does Windows Phone and Windows 8. (It's actually much worse on Windows 8; pretty much every app there is a worthless website frontend.)

Re:The question is... (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#42594843)

If it's purely a webview encapsulated in an app, then of course it's worthless. But most web apps aren't that. They have more functionality than a web page.

There are examples of simple webview apps on iOS, but it's a tiny proportion.

Re:The question is... (5, Insightful)

geekmux (1040042) | about 2 years ago | (#42594387)

How many of those 15,000 "apps" are actually useful, and how many are just worthless single-site frontends?

And how is this question relevant here vs. every other app store boasting the same 1:1,000 ratio of good to worthless apps?

Seems a bit premature to bash RIM for doing nothing more than what everyone else does...and that is publish huge nicely rounded marketing numbers for apps, regardless of value-add.

Re:The question is... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594611)

And how is this question relevant here vs. every other app store boasting the same 1:1,000 ratio of good to worthless apps?

But, RIM's dead! The interblogs told me so!

AAAAHHH! Zombie RIM! Run for the hills!

Re:The question is... (3, Funny)

jc42 (318812) | about 2 years ago | (#42594699)

But, RIM's dead! The interblogs told me so!

Pay no attention to those Apple fanbois, or the fandroids neither. It's only the loyal BB partisans who have The Truth.

(Hmmm ... We could use an official site to inform us of the current buzzwords for properly insulting the users of various successful commercial products. Anyone know what the BB loyalists are actually disparaged these days?)

Re:The question is... (4, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#42595055)

But, RIM's dead! The interblogs told me so!

Pay no attention to those Apple fanbois, or the fandroids neither. It's only the loyal BB partisans who have The Truth.

(Hmmm ... We could use an official site to inform us of the current buzzwords for properly insulting the users of various successful commercial products. Anyone know what the BB loyalists are actually disparaged these days?)

"BB loyalist" is about as disparaging as you need to be...

Re:The question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595231)

RIMjobbers.

Re:The question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595263)

Assholes?

Re:The question is... (-1)

GerbilSoft (761537) | about 2 years ago | (#42594739)

Anything that advertises itself as an "app" is usually worthless compared to a real program. RIM deserves the bashing for simply going along with the "trend" rather than trying to differentiate themselves.

Re:The question is... (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#42594793)

And how is this question relevant here vs. every other app store boasting the same 1:1,000 ratio of good to worthless apps?

Well for a start, it would mean that Blackberry has 15 good apps, vs 700+ good apps on iOS and Android.

Re:The question is... (0, Troll)

Whuffo (1043790) | about 2 years ago | (#42595451)

And if it's on a BlackBerry, you can't operate the app without several attempts at each button push.

I've had too much experience with those things; I supported them for a major corporation (ugh) and even had one of my own. After a month or so I was ready to trash it; my wife insisted that it was a nice phone and I should give it to her instead. So I did; a month later she was ready to stomp on it.

The only thing they ever had going for them was email - and that required a BES (or BIS) server. Now that other phones do email (very well, actually) there's no reason to put up with that RIM nonsense any longer. They've been circling the drain for a while now and their last hurrah isn't a wise investment. Take it from someone who knows; just say no and get some other kind of phone. You'll be glad you did

Re:The question is... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595561)

And if it's on a BlackBerry, you can't operate the app without several attempts at each button push.

I won't argue the past - haven't personally had these problems - but BB10 carries over *nothing* from legacy BB. Don't make assumptions before trying it.

Re:The question is... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595963)

Fucking RIM shill. Get lost.

Re:The question is... (1, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42594925)

Seems a bit premature to bash RIM for doing nothing more than what everyone else does

In the general case, that's true. But when you consider the thrashing they've been taking in recent memory, doing "nothing more" than anyone else does probably won't accomplish a whole lot for them.

Re:The question is... (1)

Old97 (1341297) | about 2 years ago | (#42595311)

Quite relevant because what matters is the true count of useful applications - not the filler. By your reckoning (1:1000) that means RIM has 15 useful applications for BB10. Nothing to brag about. I've got 4 times that many very useful iOS apps on the devices I own and I've just scratched the surface. Android using friends of mine have dozens of useful apps on theirs.

Re:The question is... (3, Informative)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#42595607)

Quite relevant because what matters is the true count of useful applications - not the filler. By your reckoning (1:1000) that means RIM has 15 useful applications for BB10. Nothing to brag about. I've got 4 times that many very useful iOS apps on the devices I own and I've just scratched the surface. Android using friends of mine have dozens of useful apps on theirs.

More specifically it means that they have 15 useful applications *from this portathon*. I suspect the number to be higher - as it's fairly easy to port opengl games and html5 apps, outside of android apps.

They've already said they'll have over 70k apps at launch - it's not like this one-weekend event is their only effort to get applications on the platform. Unofficial estimates put them over 100k. That'll mean ~100 useful apps (if we stick with 1:1000) -- whhich is, frankly, on par with other platforms.

They've also previously said that they have 90% of the most popular 600 android and ios apps, and 18 of the top 20 apps .

Re:The question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595979)

... for doing nothing more than what everyone else does

Sounds like someone needs a signal-to-noise refresher.

Let's pretend the GP was serious. If fart apps comprise a significant amount of apps being generated, then RIM has a major issue. Your defense in comparing to other platforms seems out of place due to the number of apps generated overall (assuming they aren't the same ratio, which I'm sure is not). Put it this way... piss in an olympic sized pool is bad (or not)... piss in the bathtub is worse.

Re:The question is... (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about 2 years ago | (#42595273)

I'd be more interested in finding out how many of those are even legit.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57562905-94/blackberry-app-world-said-to-hawk-pirated-android-apps/ [cnet.com]

Re:The question is... (3, Insightful)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#42595699)

I'd be more interested in finding out how many of those are even legit.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57562905-94/blackberry-app-world-said-to-hawk-pirated-android-apps/ [cnet.com]

That's not a platform issue, it's an asshattery issue. You can also find tens of thousands of apps that are repackaged iOS/Android apps on iOS/Android - with few or no changes.

Like any other platform, they can't reasonably go to check each app submission against every known platform and verify the credentials of the developer match up - it's not realistic which is why none of the others do it.

RIM has made it very easy for any legitimate app developer to file a claim and have an app taken down - and responds to such complaints much more quickly than its rivals based on actual results.

Re:The question is... (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 2 years ago | (#42595285)

A better question: how many of those 15,000 apps were actually ported by the original developer [theregister.co.uk] ? Apparently RIM has had a slew of unauthorized individuals grabbing popular Android apps, stripping them of their protection, then using RIM's own tools to convert them to a format compatible with BB10, before finally submitting the apps as their own original work. The fact that they just incentivized that behvaior by paying $100 for every cheap port suggests to me that they likely had a whole lot of that going on.

Re:The question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595633)

About the same ratio as on Apple and Google “stores”.

Re:The question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42596045)

More like: how many of these are stolen applications from Android and repackaged by a criminal to use BB's Android layer?

Thankfully... (0, Flamebait)

222 (551054) | about 2 years ago | (#42594231)

Thankfully, quick / rushed ports have never been buggy or otherwise lacking in quality. As someone that manages a Blackberry only shop, I can't wait until we finish migrating away from BES.

Re:Thankfully... (3, Informative)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | about 2 years ago | (#42594311)

The idea is that BB10 supports those frameworks already. Some ports are as simple as setting up the tools and clicking a button. Hopefully the more complex ones are given the time they need.

Re:Thankfully... (4, Interesting)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#42594627)

That's my thinking. If all you have to do is a quick rejig and recompile because the APIs are so close to the Android ones, then it's a near-zero effort situation. I don't know much about the new platform, but I thought I had read that it would support Android apps out of the box, so it may literally may be just pushing a button.

Not that there's a damned wrong with that. If Android compatibility or portability is good enough, then you already have thousands of apps ready to go and you don't need to put massive amounts of effort into convincing developers to support your platform (like Redmond is doing).

Re:Thankfully... (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 2 years ago | (#42595389)

Android apps don't even work consistently between different phones and different versions of Android. I have no expectation that you could just hit recompile and have your app work flawlessly (or as well as it did on Android devices) on BlackBerry devices. It just isn't going to happen.

Re:Thankfully... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595447)

The ability to port Android apps depends on a few things:

1) Version. I don't think any Android app above 2.3 can be ported
2) Device dependency - anything that depends on a proprietary device or driver won't work, either
3) Anything that's developed for a specific "skin" probably won't work, either.

In many cases, a developer can just upload an .APK file to RIM and they'll spit out a .BAR that will likely work.

Re:Thankfully... (5, Informative)

trampel (464001) | about 2 years ago | (#42595511)

That's my thinking. If all you have to do is a quick rejig and recompile because the APIs are so close to the Android ones, then it's a near-zero effort situation. I don't know much about the new platform, but I thought I had read that it would support Android apps out of the box, so it may literally may be just pushing a button.

Not that there's a damned wrong with that. If Android compatibility or portability is good enough, then you already have thousands of apps ready to go and you don't need to put massive amounts of effort into convincing developers to support your platform (like Redmond is doing).

BB10 contains the Android Player, which essentially runs repackaged Android APK files (I'm don't know if the reason for the different package format is technical or not). This is different from the native APIs, but the user experience is quite seamless. I "ported" one of my apps to the Playbook, and it was not even a recompile - it is a package converter.

Re:Thankfully... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42594331)

Be careful soon the RIM fanbois will be out saying bad things about you for admitting this. It can't possibly be that there is something wrong with BES, no it has to be every person to ever admin it was incompetent and untrained.

Re:Thankfully... (2)

Bobfrankly1 (1043848) | about 2 years ago | (#42594415)

Be careful soon the RIM fanbois will be out saying bad things about you for admitting this. It can't possibly be that there is something wrong with BES, no it has to be every person to ever admin it was incompetent and untrained.

RIM fanbois?...thinks for awhile....you mean employees?

Re:Thankfully... (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42594645)

Here I will call them out for you:

BES sucks, getting rid of it was a huge win for the entire sysadmin team. We no longer had to repush servicebooks or restart the BES just so one user could start to get emails again. Doing that last one was painful because then the other BES users, who did not read the email about the pending restart, would call in to inform us that they were not getting mail during the restart. We no longer have to send back devices that for no known reason will never allow themselves to be setup for BES or any of those other headaches.

That should get them going pretty good.

Re:Thankfully... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594535)

Be careful soon the RIM fanbois will be out saying bad things about you for admitting this. It can't possibly be that there is something wrong with BES, no it has to be every person to ever admin it was incompetent and untrained.

Well i have a BB curve and an HTC the BB curve beats the hell outta the HTC . I will be interested to see how the new BB10 shapes up if it is anything like a good as the curve it is a sure winner unlike the iPhone thingmejig imean what is that POS get real

Re:Thankfully... (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 2 years ago | (#42594735)

Our BES server was retired last year. First it was turned into a temporary camera server, until we decided a Win7 desktop with a good video card could handle it better. Then it was turned into some weird printer app server for a while, until we decided that a desktop could handle that better too. We thought about virtualizing it, just in case someone ever wanted to get a Blackberry again, then we realized how dumb that was and decommissioned it for good.

A shame, it was one of the least temperamental servers we had.

Re:Thankfully... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594867)

> Thankfully, quick / rushed ports have never been buggy or otherwise lacking in quality

Buggy? no 100$ for you, try resubmitting after polishing it up.

The Summoning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594265)

In the name of all that is unholy, I summon the King Troll by uttering his vile name three times:

APK! APK! APK!!!!!!

so why would i buy a blackberry? (3, Insightful)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#42594269)

instead of an iphone or one of the Galaxy phones?

do they do anything that iOS or Android does not?

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (4, Funny)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 2 years ago | (#42594363)

it has... Canadian Technology!

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594745)

it has... Canadian Technology!

So....it asks you nicely before it crashes? Or just apologizes afterwards?

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594835)

No it cross checks you into the boards while serenading you with Alanis Morissette songs, before pouring maple syrup on your concussed head, ya hoser.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (2)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 2 years ago | (#42595459)

Hey, take off, eh?

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595189)

It is a-boat programming in 2 official languages, and run on Canadian bacon and Maple Syrup, eh?

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595253)

it has... Canadian Technology!

So it has a unwashed and rude to americans mouse running on a wheel after a piece of stinky cheese powering it?

Id buy something made in america before Id buy something from canada. Hell, Id rather buy something made in iraq before I bought it from canada or america.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (3, Funny)

c (8461) | about 2 years ago | (#42595329)

it has... Canadian Technology!

There's an excellent "Cold Or Not" app...

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#42594443)

To me, the only thing that differentiates the BlackBerry devices is the presence of the BES server so you can access your company Exchange. And I think the phone to phone messaging is supposed to be more secure.

But, as a consumer, BlackBerry has always had its strengths in the corporate environment -- which is why people started buying the other makes of smart phones when they became available. Because, for the most part, people have no need to connect to a corporate Exchange on their personal phone.

And, really, having seen the hassles my wife has had with the Playbook I bought her a year ago ... they don't have anything which interests me ... given that the OS should be based on QNX, it should be fast and stable, and my wife tells me her Playbook is anything but.

And now they're still trying to come out with stuff which is relevant, which they may or may not succeed at.

I know one person who has had a BB device of some form or another for years, and he swears by them. But then I'm hard pressed to think of anybody else outside of people who get them from work who give a damn. My limited experience with them left me underwhelmed.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42594601)

Android, iOS and WinPhone now can talk directly to Exchange and any other email server that uses ActiveSync. They can also be controlled that way, so BES is not really that valuable anymore.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 2 years ago | (#42594797)

that's not the issue. BES can control individuals or groups of phones to only run certain programs or access certain features. that's what's missing from those alternatives + Exchange

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595303)

BES can control individuals or groups of phones to only run certain programs or access certain features. that's what's missing from those alternatives + Exchange

From a user's perspective, that makes Blackberry worse, not better. IT might think it's great, but unless IT is buying the phone and paying for the plan, users are in charge of the purchasing decision and they'll pick Android and Apple phones.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#42595337)

you can do this with add on products for ios and android. and you can do it to some extent on iOS as well with some little known apple tools to manage iphones in the enterprise

but why would anyone want to? the itunes app store already weeds out malware. this whole management thing sounds like power hungry IT nazis wanting some sense of control.

i can understand in situations like HIPAA or some other special cases, but most organizations BES is overkill

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (3, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#42594827)

Oh, I agree ... historically, that's been the primary reason for BlackBerry stuff. If you can access Exchange from other devices readily, what does RIM bring to the table?

At which point, they're just another manufacturer with nothing to differentiate themselves or make their platform a better choice.

If they don't have something nobody else does, I don't know what is going to bring customers they've already lost back.

I'd love to see a list of reasons why someone should go with a BlackBerry, because I'm at a loss to come up with a single one myself. That's not to say they don't exist, but they need to be sure to explain to people why it's worth looking at their products.

There was a time I'd have said "a phone running QNX, wow, that must be awesome". Now I just wonder how badly they've mangled QNX.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595681)

Android, iOS and WinPhone now can talk directly to Exchange and any other email server that uses ActiveSync. They can also be controlled that way, so BES is not really that valuable anymore.

Exchange Active Synch does not synch Notes on any device, including oddly enough Windows 8 phones. Blackberry does synch Notes into MemoPad.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594639)

For me blackberry really dropped the ball with postponing the launch of BB10. I had been a dedicated blackberry user, my last 3 phones being blackberry. When it was time for me to upgrade after having the torch for 2 years, there was nothing worth upgrading to. I inevitably switched to a samsung galaxy s3 android. There are some things i miss about my BB, but as of now i would never go back.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595201)

But, as a consumer, BlackBerry has always had its strengths in the corporate environment -- which is why people started buying the other makes of smart phones when they became available. Because, for the most part, people have no need to connect to a corporate Exchange on their personal phone.

And then, RIM attempted to make a solid business tool into something teen girls would fawn over.

There's a reason the company is dying (fluff articles about apps be damned); and they deserve to die.

I only wish that there was something that could take their place. No, fanboys, neither Android nor iPhone have anything to say to what Blackberry provided to the enterprise(tm).

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

Ravaldy (2621787) | about 2 years ago | (#42594493)

Watch the video. It has a couple of interesting features. Nothing that would sell me until they prove they deserve a second chance

The Keyboard and personnal/business modes are the interesting features to a guy like me. I just gotta hang on to that iPhone 3 a little longer before I choose my next phone.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#42594665)

Why, do you want to donate it to a museum?

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (3, Funny)

TsuruchiBrian (2731979) | about 2 years ago | (#42595385)

If he doesn't donate it soon, Harrison Ford will just do it for him.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (3, Informative)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about 2 years ago | (#42594959)

Email, mostly. It's much easier to type out an email message (or text, for that matter) on a physical keyboard than on a touchscreen. For me, that's a really big deal.

There's also an argument to be made about the Blackberry feeling more "industrial" or "professional" than iPhones or Androids. I don't particularly care about being able to play games or watch Netflix on my phone because I use my phone for business and for placing calls. I imagine I'm in the minority on that one though, because it seems like many people today view their phone as some all-in-one gaming machine that happens to make phone calls as well.

Personally, I can't wait to be able to ditch my Android and get back to a half-screen-half-keyboard Blackberry, provided the phone is responsive and the battery life is decent.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#42595037)

If the user interface really feels like the one in the N9 (look pretty much like it), should be pretty nice to use. And if have the apps you need and/or can run native android ones, i would say that is a better option. At least until Sailfish comes out.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595137)

instead of an iphone or one of the Galaxy phones?

do they do anything that iOS or Android does not?

They are really great in the sense that have amazing nostalgia factors built into them. Youd swear from the first time you use it that you have a device from 12 or 15 years ago. It does a wonderful job of giving you that old and dated feel of something that cant keep up with modern stuff. Ah the memories it brings back.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | about 2 years ago | (#42595373)

You can ask the same question in all three directions- why choose an iPhone or Android phone over BlackBerry?

Traditionally the answer to that question has been "because BlackBerry sucks". But I'm open to the possibility that that might change. If BB10 has sorted out the user interface, found a way of stocking the app store, and improved the reliability (perhaps built in some fallback modes that prevent the device from bricking up every time the RIM servers go down), then I see no reason not to consider it along with the rest of the line-up next time I make a purchase. I'm not a fanboy- I like my Android phone, but I'd have no qualms ditching the platform if something better comes along.

Although a few more things I like about my Android are the easiness to root it, the easiness to sideload apps, and of course the open-source nature. I have no idea how the BB10 phones will perform on the first two points, and obviously it doesn't pass the third.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (1)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#42595397)

instead of an iphone or one of the Galaxy phones?

do they do anything that iOS or Android does not?

Well, you cannot get your meeting schedules synced to your BMW without a Blackberry.

But with 10, I think RIM is losing one important selling point - the physical keyboard. Touch screens are orders of magnitude more error prone, and capacitive screens are even unusable in some conditions. (The Galaxy Note II has a stylus, but who wants to lug THAT thing around?)
It becomes just one of many.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (3, Informative)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#42595733)

instead of an iphone or one of the Galaxy phones?

do they do anything that iOS or Android does not?

Well, you cannot get your meeting schedules synced to your BMW without a Blackberry.

But with 10, I think RIM is losing one important selling point - the physical keyboard. -snip-.

No, RIM is releasing models with both all-touch and physical keyboards.

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595521)

One of the advantages of true push email vs Active Sync is battery life. You don't have to keep polling the server. That's a big plus for RIM (I say as a former BB user and now huge fandroid who carries a spare battery)

Re:so why would i buy a blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595751)

The only questions I care about:

- Does it have a real actual true physical keyboard?
- Can I easily replace the OS / boot-loader?
- Does the factory OS have root and shell access, a proper terminal, a proper file manager, a media player with streaming support, a decent text editor, a good browser, a good e-mail client, and a usable video/image/sound editor?
- Do all those programs support add-ons, scripting and modding?
- Is it open or locked-down? (As in: Can I install my own software?)
- Am I treated like an idiot by the OS? (Like iOS, Android and WP all do.)
- Are the specs (CPU, RAM, memory, bus speeds, proper display) alright?
- Does it offer all the necessary ports in standard formats?
- Do I still get full guarantee, even after replacing the OS / boot-loader?
And finally:
- Can I afford it and is it worth the money?

Port existing apps? Of course they would (1)

ckhorne (940312) | about 2 years ago | (#42594313)

If you're a developer / company with an existing BB app, and you see that your product is about to be EOL'd because there's an new OS coming out, then it be prudent to port your app to the new version. Presumably at least some existing apps make money on RIM devices. I have no idea what's involved in the port - whether it's a refactoring of codebase or complete re-write, but 15,000 apps that want to keep pulling money in the door sounds relatively low compared to the total number in iOS or driod stores...

Re:Port existing apps? Of course they would (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594475)

Most iOS apps don't make enough money to break even.

Source Article [imore.com]
InfoGraphic [imore.com]

Re:Port existing apps? Of course they would (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594539)

A complete rewrite with a different language. Old BB is Java, BB10 is Qt + QML (that is, C++). Oh, and a re-design due to a new UI paradigm, of course. So basically the same as porting an application to any new platform.

Re:Port existing apps? Of course they would (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594769)

A complete rewrite with a different language. Old BB is Java, BB10 is Qt + QML (that is, C++). Oh, and a re-design due to a new UI paradigm, of course. So basically the same as porting an application to any new platform.

Unless, of course, they wrote for android, opengl w/ c/c++, or html5 - in which a simple port is minimal.

App bounty (1)

EdZ (755139) | about 2 years ago | (#42594335)

So essentially, BlackBerry have paid $1.5 million in order to have a few thousand apps (of indeterminate utility) in their store for launch.

Re:App bounty (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594481)

Which is dirt cheap considering hourly rates for even starting developers. I would expect that Microsoft, for example, has poured tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars for boosting the WP app store.

Re:App bounty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594617)

Thank you for restating what the summary already said.

Re:App bounty (5, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#42594677)

Which, if you think about it, probably is a wise investment.

If on day one there's 15 apps, nobody is going to buy one because it's dead on arrival and the money you spent developing it would be a waste. If there's 15,000 apps, it's possible to conclude it's not a completely useless platform.

Releasing it without apps would be suicide, because there's nothing interesting about a smart phone you can't get software for. By now, anybody who has had a smart phone has a list of a handful of apps which are deal breakers.

Now, the question remains as to if enough people will care enough to buy these. I'm not sure anything RIM does at this point is going to make me say "oooh, I need a BlackBerry" ... but they do need to get a significant amount of people to do that.

Re:App bounty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594693)

This is far more useful of a summary than the original summary.

Just to kick the hornets nest a bit harder, how much did Microsoft pay for their App Store launch? (Depending on how you define it) A bit more than $1.5m? Took them 3+ months to hit 15k.

RIM basically bought the apps (2)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 2 years ago | (#42594399)

FTFA:
"RIM was offering US$100 for each app ported and subsequently approved for sale in the BlackBerry 10 app store"

This isn't any indication that people are leaving their favorite fondle-slab for RIM's.

Re:RIM basically bought the apps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594657)

FTFA:
"RIM was offering US$100 for each app ported and subsequently approved for sale in the BlackBerry 10 app store"

This isn't any indication that people are leaving their favorite fondle-slab for RIM's.

I'd rather have a fondle-slab than a RIM job

Yah, sure (4, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | about 2 years ago | (#42594831)

Because 100 dollars is a fortune! I mean, it would get you a whole hour of my time! I will EAT TONIGHT!

The smart developer doesn't restrict himself to one platform, especially in a market that already has seen major shifts.

Re:RIM basically bought the apps (1)

carlvlad (942493) | about 2 years ago | (#42595023)

I know this may not be a sure thing, but looking at the bright side, I don't think RIM would just easily pay $100 for any fart apps and generic clones. I really hope the app environment is polished enough for RIM to disrupt the market hold of iOS and Android. And I say the same to Windows Phone 8, Symbian, MeeGo, and upcoming trends of browser based OS too. There are no such thing as too many competition for consumers.

Poor reviewers... (2)

rzr (898397) | about 2 years ago | (#42594437)

I am wondering how long will it takes to review all of those apps .... is there a alt community store for FLOSS ? because, mine is a meego's basic (but helpful) text editor and it is pending since sunday ... and I am ready to share sources ... -- http://rzr.online.fr/q/qnx [online.fr]

You get what you ask for (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594567)

Everybody complains about new platforms not having enough apps (even if it's in the dozens of thousands already) so companies react by trying to attract lots of apps (no matter how bad they are).

Now everybody complains that the apps are crap. So what do you want: quality or quantity? Can't pick both.

I would rather go for a smallish app environment with decent apps than the load of crap there is in Android right now.

Do they still require a business plan? (4, Interesting)

shirikodama (2670887) | about 2 years ago | (#42594717)

After going through hoop after hoop to try to release an app to their store including notarized this, and documented that... for a FREE FRIGGING APP, I gave up when they told me that I needed to submit a business plan to them. I couldn't believe it.

Re:Do they still require a business plan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594809)

What was that, 3 years ago, maybe 5?

It's simple now, a couple of forms and a few clicks to get set up as a vendor.

Signing keys are free and automated - couple of clicks.

Re:Do they still require a business plan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595541)

Don't let logic get in the way of a frustrated developer who doesn't care whether his facts are true or not.

HP?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594829)

This is what HP should have done with webOS...

Re:HP?? (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about 2 years ago | (#42595455)

And Nokia with Maemo/Meego, and Canonical with Ubuntu mobile, and so on. In the other hand, HP could join the effort having common api calls with Plasma Active, Sailfish and Ubuntu mobile [slashdot.org] . In fact, WebOS could too, and run basically the same apps in all those platforms (probably will require recompilation for/from BB). And a common ecosystem could provide a lot of apps for all the involved parties.

This should be interesting... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594865)

I wonder if Angry Birds is one og those apps. The presence of an Angry Birds port on a platform is pretty much the barometer of whether that platform is worth a damn or not. BlackBerry was done in the past few years by a complete failure to effectively respond to the paradigm shift of the original iPhone. Compounding their problems, all their competitors are sporting MS Exchange capability, and some form of mobile device management without a high cost, dedicated 3rd party server. BB10 will need to kick ass to make a dent in the market...

Re:This should be interesting... (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about 2 years ago | (#42595233)

Depends. The Maemo-powered Nokia N900 was the first device to receive Angry Birds and yet Nokia treated the device as its red-headed step child and ran the Maemo platform into the ground.

Yeah but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42594907)

They may be able to brag about attracting all of these apps, but the blackberry 10 as a device itself still sucks, and everyone will still be buying iPhones and Androids.

Re:Yeah but... (1)

saihung (19097) | about 2 years ago | (#42595883)

And you know this because you're an industry insider who's gotten a demo unit to play with? Oh wait, no you're not, you've never touched a BB10 device either and you're just talking out of your butt.

Yeah, right. (1)

Animats (122034) | about 2 years ago | (#42594917)

Most of those "apps" are probably some kind of web content that was run through a packaging system to turn it into an "app".

Maramalade? (3, Informative)

djlemma (1053860) | about 2 years ago | (#42594919)

Guess a typo in TFA got carried over into TFS. I was trying to search out all these SDK's and google got confused..

So for those interested, it's spelled exactly like the stuff you put on toast. Info here.. [madewithmarmalade.com]

Blackberry popular in Africa (2)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | about 2 years ago | (#42595075)

RIM is popular in Africa:
http://www.economist.com/news/business/21567977-its-devices-are-still-popular-there-africa-wont-save-rim-blackberry-babes [economist.com]

And for your amusement, check out this genius sketch from Ronnie Corbett, "My Blackberry is not Worlking" [Credit: BBC - thanks Beeb!]:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAG39jKi0lI [youtube.com]

I'm getting one (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42595349)

I've had Android devices for a couple years now and frankly I miss the Blackberry's focus on email and messaging. I'm pretty excited to get a new Blackberry, and if it has some basic apps that I like, such as Songza and a mindless game, then I am going to be happy. The work/personal split personality aspects of the device is very intriguing. I really hope this device takes off so I won't be the only one with a BB10 device. :)
(capcha: prized) --coincidence?!

BB10 more sellable than Win8/WinRT (2)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about 2 years ago | (#42595583)

In all honest, Blackberry even as it stands now has better integration, infrastructure, and toe-holds in the enterprise market for mobile than Microsoft will ever get with respect to mobile. So, yeah - they'll do well and they'll steal market share that Microsoft might otherwise have gotten - and really needs. Look for BB to outsell MS in the mobile space once again with BB10.

Re:BB10 more sellable than Win8/WinRT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42596105)

not after that java based piece of crap they called BES. That piece of garbage is out of most of my server rooms and it will stay that way.

Re:BB10 more sellable than Win8/WinRT (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | about 2 years ago | (#42596191)

In all honest, Blackberry even as it stands now has better integration, infrastructure, and toe-holds in the enterprise market for mobile than Microsoft will ever get with respect to mobile.

First, I'm not remotely a Windows fan. I like my iPhone and I could be happy with an Android, but I have zero interest in Windows Portable Tiny or whatever the official name is this month. That said, you really think BB could have better enterprise - read: "Exchange" - integration than Microsoft could (if they decided they wanted to pursue it)? It would be pretty easy for MS to market themselves as the "real" messaging provider, not the knockoff who just piggybacks off their stuff. Or more simply, "why play with toys like BES when you can integrate directly with your Exchange server?"

BES and its ecosystem survives because MS had no reason to kill or out-compete it before. They have one now.

Battery & Better Hardware/Usability can tip sc (1)

houbou (1097327) | about 2 years ago | (#42595725)

Blackberry was the dominant smartphone. While many scoff at the keyboard, this phone was first and foremost meant for business. Whatever else you could say, it worked and depending on how you managed your apps and OS configuration, it had a superior life to any of today's phone. In this world everything is possible and Blackberry could get a boost in sales if their hardware and usability have kicked a notched up to match Android/IOS phones and most of all, have a superior battery life. I would go back in a heartbeat!

Re:Battery & Better Hardware/Usability can tip (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 years ago | (#42595949)

The only way they'll do that is if they skimp on the screen. A small or low res screen can be used with a smaller backlight. My Android phone will last nearly a week if I don't use it. It'll only go about 4 or so hours with the screen on. It's not like Blackberry have some energy saving magic no one else has access to. Their older phones with keyboards sacrificed screen size for the keyboard, giving them less screen space to illuminate.

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