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What Will The Expanding World of ChromeOS Mean For Windows?

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the if-only-it-was-more-useful-sans-network dept.

Google 263

Nerval's Lobster writes "Hewlett-Packard is the latest PC manufacturer to jump into the Chromebook game, whipping the curtain back from a 14-inch device loaded with Google's Chrome OS. Powered by a dual-core Intel Celeron processor, and touting roughly 4.25 hours of battery life, the HP Pavilion Chromebook follows in the footsteps of other Chromebooks released by Acer and Samsung over the past few months. While these manufacturers continue to produce devices loaded with Windows, the growth of Chrome OS could spark some worry among Microsoft executives, who have become used to their hardware partners operating as Windows-only shops. But is Chrome OS a true threat to Windows, or just a way for manufacturers to gain some additional leverage in negotiating with Microsoft over licensing fees and other matters?"

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First Chrome (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786061)

Hey BALLMER! Suck my balls!

Re:First Chrome (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786785)

Were those your balls? I thought they were peanuts.

-- SB

The Year of the Linux Desktop arrives? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786073)

Shame that it's in a creepy, Google-centric way. Goodbye, last vestiges of privacy!
(also, first post)

Re:The Year of the Linux Desktop arrives? (4, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#42786241)

I don't get why they're pushing ChromeOS (I mean I do but it's fail).

We want a fucking Android Desktop flavor.

Linux hardware support + big company with lots of OEM friends and lots of capital to put towards ironing out issues + a popular platform everyone knows and trusts = death to windows.

Re:The Year of the Linux Desktop arrives? (1)

somersault (912633) | about 2 years ago | (#42786451)

Why would you want Android on the desktop? I love Android, but I don't want it on my desktop.

Besides, if you want that, you can get a tablet and a bluetooth mouse/keyboard. Or get an Asus Transformer with the keyboard/touchpad/battery attachment.

I'm happy with both Windows 7 and Mint on my desktops just now.

Celeron? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786081)

If it has a celeron in it, there is no need for Microsoft to worry.

Re:Celeron? (4, Insightful)

Jawnn (445279) | about 2 years ago | (#42786137)

Really? And compared to your average tablet, how does the Celeron fare? The Chromebook's niche is not that of a PC. Hell, it's not even like that of a traditional notebook. Given that, the Celeron processor is more than up to the task.

Re:Celeron? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786231)

I don't know, my Cray supercomputer really makes these web apps FAST!

Re:Celeron? (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#42786349)

but the article is about chromeos replacing desktop use os...

Re:Celeron? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786363)

Who cares? CPU isn't the limiting factor on either a tablet or a chromebook. The lack of productivity software is.

Re:Celeron? (2)

Guspaz (556486) | about 2 years ago | (#42786689)

The dual-core SandyBridge celeron you find in the HP units is significantly faster than any ARM processor currently on the market. Of course, it also draws far more power, since it's a different class of processor. Apples and oranges there.

is Chrome OS a true threat to Windows? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786111)

For the reasons stated in the summary, from the manufacturer's standpoint it just doesn't matter. The effort to port ChromeOS, measured in engineer hours, could easily be paid for by a 50 cent drop in the per laptop licensing fee for Windows. It's a good gamble. It's a win either way.

Personally though, a Nexus 10, with all those pretty pixels, and a bluetooth keyboard seems to fill this niche better than anything I've seen with a hinge.

Windows 8 (5, Insightful)

schneidafunk (795759) | about 2 years ago | (#42786121)

Windows 8 is the true threat to windows.

Re:Windows 8 (4, Interesting)

StoneyMahoney (1488261) | about 2 years ago | (#42786223)

MS aren't doing themselves any favours. If Windows 8, Windows Mobile, Surface and the planned changes to Small Business Server are anything to go by, it appears their new hobby is committing economic suicide. That's a pretty big threat to Windows and I know a lot of Windows server administrators who are starting to get nervous.

Re:Windows 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786299)

Yes, Microsoft really is on the brink of economic ruin. Especially with Windows 8, which grew revenues by 24% to $6 billion in the last quarter, selling 60 million copies. Ruined I tell you! And Surface, selling a million units at a net profit per unit. They're really burying themselves with that stinker! By expanding production and availability of Surface, they're going to earn even *more* profit! What are they thinking?!?!

right... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786373)

And revenue down 20% overall...

Re:Windows 8 (4, Informative)

StoneyMahoney (1488261) | about 2 years ago | (#42786775)

I don't usually respond to ACs, but when figures need correcting I make an exception. MS shipped 1.25m Surface tablets Q4 last year but sales figures were only around 700,000. Compared to iPad sales of 22million over the same quarter, that's awful for a major-league product from a tech titan like MS: http://www.zdnet.com/microsoft-surface-with-windows-rt-tablet-sales-disappoint-in-fourth-quarter-7000010688/ [zdnet.com]

Windows 8 also doesn't have anywhere else to go but up. It's first quarters numbers will always be inflated by people chasing the latest and greatest at any cost, large enterprises stockpiling licenses early. Also, while it's profit isn't exactly weak, it's certainly not as dominant as it was was 2010 Q1 and previously, especially compared to other tech companies - the eponymous Apple being on of them - that seem to be capitalising nicely on Microsoft's slow erosion. Whether it can be halted is another matter but based on recent sales figures, it's not looking good for Microsoft ever returning to it's former glory days.

Re:Windows 8 (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#42786781)

Mmmmm what does that koolaid taste like?

Re:Windows 8 (4, Insightful)

Agares (1890982) | about 2 years ago | (#42786307)

I agree with you say, and that is why I try to learn as much as I can about every peice of technology I come into contact with. That way I am not tied into a single thing that could eventually die off some day. Nothing lasts forever everyone knows that, and that is why I think knowing just Windows, Linux, or Mac OSX is a bad idea. You are putting all your eggs in one basket so to speak.

Re:Windows 8 (1)

StoneyMahoney (1488261) | about 2 years ago | (#42786795)

I do exactly the same thing - I work on a helpdesk that supports both Windows and Mac. I'm also teaching myself Linux on the side, although where on earth do you start figuring out basic Linux desktop support in an environment so fractured and chaotic?! Loving CLI servers though ;)

Agreed (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786333)

I *need* Windows, the apps I run can only run on Windows. Yet I cannot find a Windows PC that's suitable.

I want, i7 or i5, 4Gb+ ram, big portrait monitor for code, these days 2500 vertical pixels I think should be the minimum. I want mouse and window system, because touch doesn't really work on a big screen. I want quiet, I want DVDR+-, card reader, reliable big hard disks, RAID perhaps, maybe SSD if the price come way down.

I took a look at the Windows 8 all in ones, there's a Dell one with a big 27" screen. Yet you can't rotate the screen into portrait for code editing, the DVD is on the side, and would be on the bottom if you rotated it! I also see them use touch in the review video by tilting the screen till it's almost flat. Seriously? Do you imagine anyone wants to use it like that?? What are they going to do? Tilt it to touch and move the mouse, then tilt it vertically to read the screen??

It's like Microsoft's directionless right now, a ship without a captain, just trying to copy Apple or Google depending on what day of the week it is!

So, IMHO, Chrome will take the just-for-surfing market, because Ballmer seems quite clueless. But the core development/business market they could still keep simply by basic competence. Yet they push Windows 8 to everyone????? Why! Seriously why push a touch OS on a non-touch user??

Re:Agreed (0, Troll)

dingen (958134) | about 2 years ago | (#42786441)

I *need* Windows, the apps I run can only run on Windows.

I suppose you mean "the apps I want to run are only available on Windows", because obviously there is no such thing as software that is only able to run on Windows. A computer running Windows is just a turing machine, like any other computer and thus cannot execute code another computer can't.

Disagree (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786823)

"because obviously there is no such thing as software that is only able to run on Windows"

If they don't port it, it doesn't run, and their commercial decision isn't a turin machine. There *is* such a thing as software that can only run on Windows.

Re:Agreed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786461)

Sounds like you want a desktop.

Re:Agreed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786607)

Rather than shop for all-in-ones or tablets, perhaps you should shop for a desktop that meets the specifications you outlined. Download a copy of Windows 7 from your faggot-friend's wares FTP.

Wow, slashdot. Rein in your fucking posters or get the fuck off the internet.

Re:Windows 8 (1)

Seb C. (5555) | about 2 years ago | (#42786505)

That and the new licensing model for Office. If they go for subscription only, customers will fly like a pack of birds...

Re:Windows 8 (1)

seant2013 (2832695) | about 2 years ago | (#42786645)

Windows 8 is the true threat to windows.

I agree with this statement. There is nothing the Chrome OS can do to Microsoft or Windows 8 that they are not already doing to themselves. Microsoft will be it's own down fall in the end.

LiveBook (5, Insightful)

spacemky (236551) | about 2 years ago | (#42786123)

Introducing the new Microsoft LiveBook. Boots right in to Microsoft's cloud-based OS. Skydrive, Skype, Office365, Bing search, Hotmail. Coming your way in 2015 or sooner.

Re:LiveBook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786167)

It's too late for Micro$oft. Everybody now knows there are other options. Buh buyy M$! Good riddance!

Re:LiveBook (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786277)

and you will be one of the first whiners when you cannot use a computer because of the linux crap. and you're mom has a penis.

Re:LiveBook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786291)

It's too late for Micro$oft. Everybody now knows there are other options. Buh buyy M$! Good riddance!

From my parents' home in Wyoming, I stab at thee! [penny-arcade.com]

Re:LiveBook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786481)

Good reference. Especially since it references a warning against "palladium". Which 10 years later became the "UEFI" bullshit that, as predicted, is nothing more than a weapon for Micro$oft (Yeah, I dollarised it too, fucking sue me) to wield against Linux and other competing OSes.

Re:LiveBook (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786655)

UEFI would work fine with linux if Linus and friends weren't such incompetent and shitty programmers.

Linus should spend more time trying to fix his awful cluster fuck of a shit OS and less time dick waving and bullying kernel contributors that give away their time for free to his pet project.

Re:LiveBook (1)

Seb C. (5555) | about 2 years ago | (#42786499)

2 years (or more) too late... Too bad, MS... I would shed a tear if you've not been that bad previously...

Re:LiveBook (1)

DrStrangluv (1923412) | about 2 years ago | (#42786527)

This is what Surface RT was _supposed_ to be. Too soon to say whether it's working... it's selling slowly, but it is selling.

Re:LiveBook (1)

fermion (181285) | about 2 years ago | (#42786637)

My issue with MS is licensing and the time it wastes, as well as version support. For instance, on a Windows 7 machine I use, which is licensed, a dialog keeps popping up telling me my software my not be genuine. Why do I want to waste my time with this. I buy a computer to be productive, not fulfill someones else marketing scheme.

So far Google has not been so bad in focusing on end users. It's development of current product, like Docs, has been disappointing but these are still useful in a limited basis, and are worth the price of free. I can see buying a chrome book if they are a good value. This would mean around $300, battery life on the order of 10 hours, 32GB SSD, and sim card so it can be used wireless with most vendors. Hard disks are unacceptable for mobile devices. I would also say more than three or so pounds would put in the class of transportable rather than mobile.

Google seems to be having problems getting into the economy niche currently occupied by low end MS Windows machines. I don't know if anyone sees Google as a premium product. The S3 is selling as the number 2 phone in the US, but that is at the same price as the basic iPhone 5, so presumably people are paying more for the iPhone 5, even thought the S3 will have equal memory as top iPhone 5 for around $280 instead of $400. And the Note does not appear to be selling.

Re:LiveBook (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about 2 years ago | (#42786717)

Introducing the new Microsoft LiveBook. Boots right in to Microsoft's cloud-based OS. Skydrive, Skype, Office365, Bing search, Hotmail. Coming your way in 2015 or sooner.

The problem is that this cannibalizes Windows to an extent that I don't Redmond is prepared to accept. They could just simply offer a cheapish tablet with features like this without it necessarily being a direct threat to Windows.

Evolutionary Niche (5, Insightful)

StoneyMahoney (1488261) | about 2 years ago | (#42786129)

It seems that Chromebooks are trying to slide into the market slot that Netbooks are currently vacating. I'm not entirely sure I understand what's going on there, netbooks were well refined products that seem to have gone out of favour and everyone is designing Chromebooks from scratch. Considering these are effectively the new dumb terminals, you'd have thought they could've done better than a Celeron and 4.25 hours of battery life - netbooks were rather more capable than Chromebooks appears to be, cost about the same and had far superior battery life.

Or has everyone (finally) just realised that 10" is really not that comfortable a form factor?

Re:Evolutionary Niche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786207)

I'm not entirely sure I understand what's going on there, netbooks were well refined products that seem to have gone out of favour and everyone is designing Chromebooks from scratch.

Um... so... a product class fell out of favor, companies are redesigning said product class in an attempt to put it back in favor... and you're confused about this turn of events?

Re:Evolutionary Niche (2)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#42786315)

When you consider that their "redesign" is keeping the low power and lousy battery life that played a big role in making said product class unfavorable, and focused on adding an even shittier UI...

No, I guess it's still not confusing. That seems to be the new Tech Company M.O. these days...

Re:Evolutionary Niche (1)

StoneyMahoney (1488261) | about 2 years ago | (#42786825)

When the redesign ruins those things that actually gave that segment it's appeal in the first place, damn right I'm confused.

Re:Evolutionary Niche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786249)

10" is ok but it depends on the form factor. Just like there are some dog chromebooks there were some really nasty netbook form factors out there. (Half screen heights, odd keyboard layouts, etc). 14" seems a little odd though, and you're dead on calling them out on battery life. It should be somewhere in between tablets and ultra books/mac air.

Re:Evolutionary Niche (5, Interesting)

Pumpkin Tuna (1033058) | about 2 years ago | (#42786311)

Chromebooks are going to be a big hit in education. I work in schools and am testing a Samsung right now. The battery life on it is rated at 6 hours, which will get you through a school day with no charging. Add to that, many school districts are taking advantage of Google's free Apps for education domains, which gives you the same version of Google Apps that businesses are paying for.

For as low as $250 on some models you get a device that does 95% of what students need to do with it, lasts all day without charging, has a screen big enough to satisfy most kids and has a full keyboard.

What's not to like?

Re:Evolutionary Niche (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786541)

>>6 hours
>>all day

lolwut?

Re:Evolutionary Niche (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 2 years ago | (#42786603)

Yeah, 6 hours is all day for school. When I was in school that's how much time I spent in school and doing homework. I'm not sure what's so confusing to you about that. When you figure the computer is turned off during lunch and breaks that's about what you get. Even an 8 hour a day job is really only 7 hours or so when you factor in breaktime.

Re:Evolutionary Niche (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786683)

You're talking about 8 hour days, 6 hour days, breaktime, and somehow you come to 7 hours. Your posts don't make any sense. I think you may be full of shit. I doubt you even go to school.

Have you ever even EXPERIENCED a 6 hour day? I thought they were about 24 hours. 6 hour days are only in Time Cube universe. 24 / 4 = 6.

Re:Evolutionary Niche (3, Funny)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about 2 years ago | (#42786707)

I wouldn't count on it. Remember that at lunch and during breaks is when the kids will be hoping to use their Chromebooks to update their Twitter feed, check out Facebook, and Google for porn.

You thought they'd put away the Chromebooks and sit nicely at the table to eat their sandwiches while studying their geometry lessons?

Re:Evolutionary Niche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786643)

How will six hours get you through a school day? My daughter's school day is 6.5 hours (8:30 till 3pm.) I guess you might be able to manage that if you don't use the laptop at lunch, but that six hours is a optimum time limit. What's the chance the kids are going to use the laptop at the right brightness level? And what are you going to do after six months when the battery performance has degraded?

Re:Evolutionary Niche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786661)

Chromebooks are going to be a big hit in education.

No, Chromebooks are being given away to educational institutions for free by companies in an effort to drum up interest in their product, and what better way to indoctrinate new users than by getting to them when they're 8 years old? The history of the industry is full of examples where a new turd gets pushed out, and hailed as "the next big thing to totally kill microsoft," and it quietly fails and dies about 6 months later. There is no reason to expect that Chromebooks will be any different.

Battery life "rated at 6 hours" means that you're likely to get 4-5, if you're doing anything other than staring at a dim screen, which means you need to have a plug at every desk, and plug it in to do homework. If you want to give kids a device that runs on battery power, it's going to need at LEAST 10 hours of battery life on a single charge to be usable in an educational environment - preferably 12 or more. With a seven hour school day, a half an hour on the bus to/from school, a couple hours of homework, maybe a trip to the library after school to do some research... you'd need to charge your 4-6hr device at least once a day, perhaps even twice if you're doing a lot of school work.

For as low as $250 on some models you get a device that does 95% of what students need to do with it

Meaning you have to spend another couple hundred on another device to do the remaining 5% of things students need to do; all the while subjecting them to Google's advertising and tracking; and 95% of what "students need to do with it" is about 5% of what "students actually want todo with it."

Chromebooks are an idiotic choice for an educational environment. The OLPC was a better choice, and THAT was pretty fucking dumb in a developed country, too. Ultrabooks (and perhaps tablets, with a keyboard accessory) were a better choice than both of those, and a full powered "small & light" laptop with a solid processor, decent amount of ram, good networking, and decent local storage is better still.

Re:Evolutionary Niche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786337)

I feel like the niche that netbooks were filling is being filled by tablets now. Most people who wanted a netbook wanted one for its small form factor and portability, and the honest fact is that a lot of people find tablets more suitable for this purpose, and they are 'hip' to top it off. As far as how Chromebooks will affect Windows? I've never had a Chromebook, but I'm eager for some more competition in the OS environment. Even if it is only like 1% of the market, ChromeOS stealing users from Windows would add variety into the market and relieve some small amount of pressure on OEMs to collapse to Microsoft's demands.

Captcha: insolent

re-revolutionary niche. (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42786745)

I feel like the niche that netbooks were filling is being filled by tablets now.

No netbooks as a more portable cheaper, laptops never went out of fashion...look at a Macbook Air or a Surface. Microsoft killed the netbook, Tablets simply are immune to Windows.

Re:Evolutionary Niche (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786559)

ChromeOS has one niche that hasn't been exploited yet, but in the day and age of VDI and wanting to not just keep devices encrypted, but preferably have no data at all that can be taken, a ChromeOS device + a Citrix Receiver can be an effective tool for a number of enterprise uses.

In business, a ChromeOS machine solves the fear of laptop seizures across borders (nothing on the laptop, so another one can be shipped.)

Windows? (-1, Redundant)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 2 years ago | (#42786171)

What's Windows?

Oh, yeah, that dinosaur thing from Microsoft. And why would I want to pay for a poorly wriiten piece of crap?

Re:Windows? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#42786215)

Because you live in the real world where Windows is pretty much the corporate standard and there's no way to get away from it?

You can get away from it on personal machines, but in any office environment -- Microsoft isn't going anywhere.

Re:Windows? (3, Interesting)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about 2 years ago | (#42786285)

I'd otherwise have agreed with you, but I'm starting to see change. A guy I know who works for the US government (probably the organization you'd expect to leap on board new tech trends *last*) reports his new CIO is aggressively investigating Google products, google hosted email, and so on.

If that's true, there's hope. Face it: Microsoft was a real innovator in the early 90s. Maybe even the late 90s. And for a while there, Microsoft software was useful in ways other software was not.

That age ended long ago, and increasingly Microsoft finds itself struggling to catch up. They have no mojo with the "young" generation, and since Windows/Office has produced no software worth writing home about. Google now has enough brand name recognition even the most easily scared/reticent CIOs can suggest Google products without fear of getting "the blank stare."

Good times for everyone. Bad times for Ballmer (who should've gotten his ass thrown out the Microsoft door - or is it a window - many, many years ago). That guy is sinking the Microsoft ship.

Re:Windows? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786455)

The US government is not a monolith. In the USDA where I currently contract, Google Chrome is banned from installation. There is alternating reticence and enthusiasm from the various agencies I've worked with lately about cloud solutions, so there a patchwork of 'progress' depending on how that's even defined.

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786345)

I'm pretty sure that's what Blackberry makers thought, only to watch their smartphone dominance go *poof* in just a few years.

Do you know how corporate players will see Chrome OS? Easy to install, zero maintenance needed, secure and trustworthy sources. All the benefits of Linux and Windows combined. Security of the first and ease of use of the second.

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786727)

Do you know how corporate players will see Chrome OS?

yes, as another pain in the ass to manage, configure, and deploy.

Also, corporate players are big on "corporate standards" - single standards that everybody uses. Chromebooks might be sufficient for "those guys in sales." They're not gonna cut it for "the guys in Engineering." Corporate standards are selected on the basis of "which device satisfies ALL of the needs of ANY of our users?"

Which means the engineering guys get slightly-slower-than-they wanted hardware, the sales guys get way-faster-than-they-needed hardware, and EVERYBODY runs Windows, Office, and Sametime for easy sharing, administration, and communication.

Also, there's going to be a (very legitimate) fear of Chromebooks opening holes through which corporate data will end up leaked or stolen, since all of their data storage and applications are "online in the cloud."

Why is it that whenever there's a "cloud" story on Slashdot, the overwhelming response is "LOL UR AN IDIOT IF U TRUST THE CLOUD," but as soon as Google offers a "cloud" based, only-available-online set of tools, the overwhelming response seems to be, "Google! Your dick! I need it in my mouth now"?

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786357)

Will see about that soon enough. I'm guessing when most sysadmins and enterprise users "use" something else at home, the enterprise will have no choice but to follow. How do you think windows got into the enterprise? Certainly not because of it was better than anything else available at that time.

Re:Windows? (1)

dingen (958134) | about 2 years ago | (#42786449)

Good thing I can get away from corporate office environments then!

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786487)

I work in a software development environment for embedded Linux. IT has to make provision for allowing Linux hosts to connect despite IT being a Windows shop. Now any sole can use Linux in our enterprise because engineers forced the need to use Linux desktops.

Why? Because of Office? Visual Studio? Excel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786553)

Seriously, you should use Open Office, or Libre Office.

I think Visual Studio in software development has already been Eclipse'd by Eclipse, when developers started focusing on Android & server side Java, Eclipse works better for that. Well at least that's what's happened with us, Visual studio isn't used now.

We still have Office licenses at work, but I can't think of the last time I wrote a text document for print out. So I've never opened MS Word! Excel is use by who? Not by me! Maybe someone in accounts? Database? We use Oracle, why would we use SQL Server?
Source control? Perforce, I don't even know what comes with that MS bundle anymore. Management order it, but I don't know why! Habit? I don't want it, they just buy a per-seat license and nobody ever wonders if we actually need it!

So you can say Microsoft aren't going anywhere because they own the corporate, but that's really just to focus on Chrome and ignore the fact they've been replaced in all areas by free or better products!

What killer app is locking Microsoft into any market now?

Re:Why? Because of Office? Visual Studio? Excel? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#42786821)

Seriously, you should use Open Office, or Libre Office.

Seriously, you should try suggesting that a multi-billion dollar, multi-national. Small shops, maybe, but larger corporations? I doubt it.

There's a lot of inertia involved to start moving corporations to something like Open Office, and corporations want to be sure they have support contracts with a vendor who can actually fix the problems -- not someone who can look at the code and submit a patch. They don't want to post on some internet forum, they want to be able to hold someone to the terms of a contract -- and I'm not convinced Open Office even covers all of the functionality people expect.

It's all of the non-technical people in all of those other jobs that keep businesses running which are going to howl the loudest if you start removing Microsoft products. And Slashdot frequently forgets that, as a group, we are NOT representative of how the rest of the world uses computers, and most of us are even further removed from how they buy software.

What killer app is locking Microsoft into any market now?

I don't disagree that for many people, there are alternatives -- but Microsoft is firmly entrenched, and is now like IBM was in the 80's and 90's, it's what everybody uses and they don't feel a strong need to move away.

But don't confuse the fact that there are alternatives with the fact that companies will continue to go with Microsoft for years to come. I can see them losing market share for home users, but a lot of places already have invested a lot in it, and continue to invest more into it for things like Sharepoint.

Many companies are now spending literally millions of dollars to roll out Win 7 ... and they're not going to walk away from that expense.

Re:Windows? (1, Interesting)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 2 years ago | (#42786741)

Yes, my company laptop uses Windows 7. But I did not pay for it. I use Outlook because it hooks into their email system that combines scheduling and tele-conferencing.

Everything else is open source because I have that choice. My development work is all on Unix.

Microsoft isn't going anywhere

Everyday, I am hearing of more and more people using an iPad or and Andoid tablet as their daily working machine. Sure, they still have that Windows desktop, but many days, it isn't even turned on. How much longer will the wallets of that 'office environment' be willing to shell out for an unused system?

So in a few years, can I quote you about MS?

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786243)

And why would I want to pay for a poorly wriiten piece of crap?

I dunno. Why would anyone want to read your poorly wriiten comments?

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786295)

Are you speaking from qualitative experience of the Windows source code there, or just repeating what all the cool kids on the forums say?

Re:Windows? (2)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 2 years ago | (#42786551)

Oh, I have NO idea what the source code looks like. I just know how it behaves. If it were written well, it wouldn't have to reboot it so often nor would it crash on me all the time. Both the Mac's OS and Linux are better choices.

Although, I do have to say, Windows XP was well done. Security was questionable, but over all, from a user perspective, it was well thought out. However, how long ago did XP come out.

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786751)

You are not using the computer right or you have some faulty hardware or drivers if you are experiencing Windows OS crashes "all the time." You should only have to reboot when you install updates (and generally not every time).

Yea, I think you have some serious issues with either yourself or your computer(s).

Re:Windows? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786407)

"... poorly wriiten piece of crap?"

Kinda like your comment?

It will mean nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786175)

Because most human beings value privacy, and acknowledge the concept of ownership rights.

Microsoft is leaps and bounds ahead of Elgoog in this regard. Azure has a better chance of gaining a broader audience than ChromeOS IMHO.

Re:It will mean nothing. (4, Insightful)

gander666 (723553) | about 2 years ago | (#42786265)

Uh, no. Most people care about having shiny baubles, and them being cheap. They may "claim" to care about privacy, but in practice, they give it up pretty freely.

Re:It will mean nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786401)

Uh, no. Most people care about having shiny baubles, and them being cheap. They may "claim" to care about privacy, but in practice, they give it up pretty freely.

Uh, yes. There is a huge difference between giving up freely, and being coerced.

There is not a single human being on Earth that does not keep a secret they would give up freely, including you. However, they might be coerced into giving it up.

Re:It will mean nothing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786485)

Don't you know all recent Windows versions comes with a virus called Windows Genuine Advantage?

Or, dare you visiting an unknown website using IE and without any shiny anti-virus software?

As for Windows 8, Microsoft expect you to use their service the same way as you use Google's service.
You get greater privacy by switching from GMail to Outlook? Google Drive to SkyDrive?

To be 100% safe, you really need to build your GNU/Linux system from source code (which can be reviewed by anyone in the world).

Of course it's a threat! (1, Interesting)

rs1n (1867908) | about 2 years ago | (#42786209)

Chrome OS is a threat in that it enables users to easily make use of Google's applications. As far as operating systems go, Windows 8 is the biggest threat to MS (in the sense that it is probably causing a lot of users to steer away from MS). But as a platform for using Google's services, MS definitely will have to worry seeing as how many of Google's applications (e.g. Google Docs) eat into Microsoft's profits.

Re:Of course it's a threat! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786599)

MS definitely will have to worry seeing as how many of Google's applications (e.g. Google Docs) eat into Microsoft's profits.

If my experience is normal then Google Docs is pretty much the one Google application Microsoft doesn't need to fear. We've been using Google Apps for Business at our place since last year. There are only twelve people in our office and we still can't leave Office without losing too much functionality. Docs is a decent replacement for Word and barely a replacement for Excel. It doesn't come close to replacing the whole Office suite.

We use Excel/Access/Outlook integration heavily so of course YMMV.

Re:Of course it's a threat! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786805)

Until the cloud has 100% uptime, probably not.

What will it mean to microsoft? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786317)

Absolutely nothing. ChromeOS is half-assed, and going nowhere.

Re:What will it mean to microsoft? (2)

Pumpkin Tuna (1033058) | about 2 years ago | (#42786473)

Yes, but if that half of the ass is the only part you use (Docs, web browsing, web 2.0 apps) Then it's a good, cheap alternative.

For content consumption, perhaps (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#42786327)

For casual use, content consumption, sure. It fills the same niche as those netbooks of a few years ago, and tablets (for the most part) now. But for content creation, they need apps that are currently only ported to Winders and OSX. So, will Chrome OS be a threat to Winders? Don't ask me, ask the developers. I couldn't possibly care less what OS the device is running. I'm only concerned about what I can do with it.

Re:For content consumption, perhaps (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786427)

that chromebooks have an SSH app is a big plus for anyone doing dev work - this, a cheap vps, github, an online editor like cloud9, a simple image editor like pixlr, and you're away. the flow isn't quite as good as using a desktop (the basic chromebook does complain quite a lot with lots of tabs open) but it's a hell of a lot smoother than windows 8 - for such a young platform, it's really quite usable.

Re:For content consumption, perhaps (1)

Pumpkin Tuna (1033058) | about 2 years ago | (#42786495)

Agreed. I could easily see it being used in my field (education) as a general-use student machine. If they need to do anything heavier (video editing, graphic design) they could move to a workstation.

What is the market niche of ChromeOS? (2)

JDG1980 (2438906) | about 2 years ago | (#42786389)

I'm not really sure where ChromeOS is supposed to fit in. For people who want to do heavyweight stuff, it's no substitute for a full-fledged OS, and people who just want a content consumption device have mostly already switched to smartphones and tablets running iOS or Android. I sort of see where it fits into Google's marketing strategy – it's an OS for people to live their entire life "in the cloud" – but is there any actual demand for that? One thing we should have learned from the WinRT and WinPhone fiascos is that just because a company thinks a product is strategically important doesn't mean that its customers are going to agree.

Re:What is the market niche of ChromeOS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786573)

Google seems to be targeting education pretty heavily with Chromebooks. There have been a number of posts and articles about this. I believe they are offering them at $99, although I haven't confirmed this and I don't know what model(s) qualify.

Outside of that, they are pretty handy around the house as a secondary light laptop that can be brought into any room for quick lookups, forum posts, etc (similar to tablets and phones but with a builtin keyboard.) I understand university students like to use them on campus as a relatively cheap device that they can use with campus wifi for research and writing papers.

Re:What is the market niche of ChromeOS? (1)

metrometro (1092237) | about 2 years ago | (#42786659)

It's a tablet with a keyboard.

MS is doomed (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786403)

Microquack Softailure has no chance against Google. They are doomed in any competition against this superior threat. But Google itself has no chance against iOS, which is far superior to Chrome OS, Ubuntu, Windows 8, and OS X.

However, using an Intel Celeron is fucking stupid. I mean, who builds microprocessors out of CELERY?

Haha, Google is doomed.

Good riddance to instability (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786431)

People just want something that works and requires little to no maintenance to maintain stability. That's why Android phones and tablets have been very successful globally. On the other hand, just performed a clean install of Windows 8 Pro and while it's noticeably less laggy than Vista it still brings the headache of instability.

Not much (1)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | about 2 years ago | (#42786445)

People and systems need Windows, I don't think we'll reach a point where we can finally sever the birth cord to it, no matter what at some point there will need to be a windows computer running. Microsoft might see sales drop off a bit but they wont, at least for a long while, need to really worry.

Chrome OS is Linux with a shell running (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786453)

I find it interesting that Google can repackage Linux with their own web browser and call it an operating system, and we have no problem with that, yet will engage in lengthy discussions about whether Stallman really invented GNU/Linux.

Chrome OS is great for what it is... (3, Informative)

zoid.com (311775) | about 2 years ago | (#42786463)

I've been using Chrome OS for over 2 years since google sent me a CR-48. I use it daily to catch up on news, emails, comics, facebook .... It sits on my nightstand is perfect for how I use it. The OS is really nice and easy to use. I would no hesitate to buy one of these devices for my dad, aunt, etc where I have to be "tech support".

Niche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786465)

It's a niche market in which Windows has only been the traditional default OS by virtue of brand recognition and stability versus other Linux variants -- sorry, but as much as I wish otherwise, that latter bit is true for the userbase at which this product is aimed.

So, the "expanding world" of Chrome OS will pretty much mean two things for Windows: jack and shit.

When TCO approaches zero... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786483)

It starts becoming a threat when Google makes it very cheap (approaching free) to own a Chrome OS device.
This will eventually be possible because Google is not in the software or hardware business, they are in the advertising business,
an industry that values collecting personal information to profile a potential sales audience.
Google will cause the collapse of the traditional software and hardware vendors because they will not be able to compete with free.
User content is king.

Well at least that is my 2c prediction...

Re:When TCO approaches zero... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786791)

TCO only approaches zero if your personal information has no value to you.

I'd be happy to pay money for devices and software that are free of intrusive advertising and tracking.

K12... (4, Insightful)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 2 years ago | (#42786539)

In North America, Chromebooks are largely an education (K12) play. The "traditional" OEMs are seeing tremendous market share erosion to iPads in schools - So this provides them with something to sell. The schools struggle with iPads because they're expensive (next to no edu-discounting from Apple), fragile, difficult to manage and are theft targets. It's also difficult to create content (such as writing and essay) on iPad.

What you're getting is (1)

DiamondGeezer (872237) | about 2 years ago | (#42786595)

A piece of hardware that boots very fast to a browser and is semi-useful when connected to the Internet.

When the Internet is not available, you have a useless metal brick.

ChromeOS does not work like that (3, Informative)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42786831)

A piece of hardware that boots very fast to a browser and is semi-useful when connected to the Internet.

When the Internet is not available, you have a useless metal brick.

ChomeOS and Google Docs do not need a permanent internet link. The work offline quite nicely. Here is a quick overview...I Googled it. http://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/devices/landing.html [google.com]

Backwards compatability (1)

jader3rd (2222716) | about 2 years ago | (#42786687)

If Chromebooks are a hit, it's evidence around how much backwards compatibility is important; or in other words, how it might be unimportant. Windows is full of bugs, which don't get fixed, or have really nasty work arounds, because somebody has a crappy written piece of software that they tell the Windows team that they can't live without. So Windows merrily, goes along shimming, or not fixing existing bugs. Perhaps a successful Chromebook would show the Windows team that the type of customers who refuse to pay for updates to broken applications are also the type of customers who aren't going to buy new copies of Windows. Giving Microsoft the guts to risk breaking 15 year old software, is what Chromebooks might do to Windows.

All things Google.. beware! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786773)

Pure NSA/corporate spyware

What cannot be done with a modern browser? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42786811)

Professional development:
Yes, we probably cannot do real-world programming projects merely inside a browser.
But old school people should really do a Google/Bing search to see how many online compilers / IDEs / interactive learning environments are already available.
Yes, I've seen low-end embedded chips with proprietary and Windows-only supply software.
But how many people ever seen "embedded" and "chip" been put together; who cares?
Anyway, how many normal people still have ideas about programming today?

Professional authoring:
We all know there are Google Apps.
There are a shit load of sophisticated online graphical editor already.
Yes, there is no Adobe Crappy Suite.
Crappy Suite is cryptic enough for some people to make a living, quite cool.
Most personal could take a break away from Adobe stuff at some point, though.

Professional gaming:
Most non-hard-core game should be available right in iPad or Android tablets.
There are Windows-only hard-core games.
What about waiting some time for PlayStation 4 or Xbox next, though?

I'd like to see if someone can add something new into the list.

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