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HP (Re-)Announces a 14" Android Laptop

timothy posted about 2 months ago | from the beats-audio-without-an-apple-logo dept.

Android 121

PC Mag reports that an upcoming laptop from HP (one that was prematurely announced in April, and now official) has decent-to-good specs — under 4 pounds, battery life more than 8 hours, Tegra processor, and a 1928x1080 touch screen — but an unusual operating system, at least for a laptop. The SlateBook 14 will run Android, rather than Windows (or ChromeOS, for that matter), which helps keep it relatively cheap, at $400. According to the article, Android is "a lot cheaper for HP to implement in a laptop; ChromeOS, in contrast, comes with more stringent system requirements that would cost HP a bit more." Ars Technica's mention in April includes a screenshot taken from a video (note: video itself appears to be disabled) which shows the keyboard layout and which reveals some Android-specific changes. Update: 06/01 19:23 GMT by T : Here's an alternative link to the promotional video.

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121 comments

A 14" phone. (0)

Animats (122034) | about 2 months ago | (#47142185)

OK, a 14" phone. Just what we needed.

Re:A 14" phone. (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47142355)

Its a labtop, not a tablet.

Re:A 14" phone. (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 2 months ago | (#47142375)

You mean like a workbench?

Re:A 14" phone. (1)

JabberWokky (19442) | about 2 months ago | (#47143741)

Its a labtop, not a tablet.

So it's a flip phone.

(Jokes aside, I like this product; I don't mean to be flip).

Re:A 14" phone. (1)

pslytely psycho (1699190) | about 2 months ago | (#47145231)

My wife Skype's with her sister quite a bit. So, in essence, her 17" laptop is a gigantic flip phone....just a tad impractical portability wise....

HP Is Being Cheap (4, Interesting)

EmperorArthur (1113223) | about 2 months ago | (#47142195)

ChromeOS, in contrast, comes with more stringent system requirements that would cost HP a bit more.

In other words, this thing is going to be really slow if you try to use it for serious work. Why? Because HP is cheap and doesn't want to shell out for decent components. That and/or they like their locked down bootloader.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (3, Insightful)

BoRegardless (721219) | about 2 months ago | (#47142251)

HP always made the best far back, like the HP-35, 45, 41cx and then PCs of high quality.

Now HP apparently seeks to blend in with the masses of the cheapest laptop designs on the Asian continent.

Who is going to match Apple for top-of-the-line laptops, which a professional can use for 5-6 years before replacement?

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 months ago | (#47142405)

dunno, my dell is a fucking tank, its not as sexy as an apple but already 3 years old, been dropped twice in the airport and still acts and looks like brand new...

not to mention it was cheap to begin with

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (1)

ThorGod (456163) | about 2 months ago | (#47142705)

call us when your dell is 6 years old

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (2)

flappinbooger (574405) | about 2 months ago | (#47143943)

call us when your dell is 6 years old

My latitude D520 was assembled from parts of many other dead Latitudes. I call it frankentop. Runs reliably. Take it everywhere. Ugly as sin. Dell latitudes are more rugged and parts are cheaper and more interchangable in my opinion. The cheap consumer Dells are more problematic.

I also have a nearly 5 year old quad core HP laptop, hasn't given me any problems other than a noisy fan that stopped being noisy after a while on it's own.

The best is a 13 year old IBM thinkpad, still going. This thing is so old it has USB 1.0. But, truly, no-one on Slashdot will be impressed by that - it isn't unusual.

Now, today, I would be a little hesitant to buy a new HP laptop. I would lean more towards a Lenovo or a Asus.

And what's with this stupid BEATS AUDIO crap? Just give me a decent sound chip that reproduces the sound and doesn't process it FOR me! I've had a beats audio HP laptop, to me it sounds like crap.

And get off my lawn.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 2 months ago | (#47145179)

Just give me a decent sound chip

And speakers (if you use them).

Branded audio isn't necessarily bad (though I gather beats is).

My SO has one of those thin Asus laptops (Zenbook). It came with Bang & Olafsson branded audio which we both thought was a massive gimmick. But it had all the other features she wanted (thin, light, quite powerful, decent battery life, runs Linux fine etc) so she got it anyway.

Well, turned out to be head and shoulders the best laptop speakers I've ever encountered. Her previous laptops were macs, and this one is very substantially better.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (1)

flappinbooger (574405) | about 2 months ago | (#47145695)

Cool, thanks for the heads-up on that, will have to look into it. Always looking for a solid laptop to recommend if nothing else.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 months ago | (#47144609)

hopefully it will be better than when my macbook turned 6 after two motherboard replacements and a keyboard that hardly functions

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (1)

bloodhawk (813939) | about 2 months ago | (#47144887)

My current Lenovo W520 is going is just over 3 years old now (16GB RAM, i7, Dual SSD's). I have an older W500 as well which is almost 6 years old now and it is also still happily working and still quite powerful (8GB, Core 2 Duo). The Lenovo's are mostly butt ugly but they do seem to last quite well.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142525)

Who is going to match Apple for top-of-the-line laptops, which a professional can use for 5-6 years before replacement?

Pretty much anyone with a flat top on the screen.
Close the lid, put the order on the lid, walk to the table, and serve the coffee.

Wouldn't a tray be lighter though?

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (2)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about 2 months ago | (#47144427)

Who is going to match Apple for top-of-the-line laptops, which a professional can use for 5-6 years before replacement?

(fanboi warning)
Origin PC. I'm north of four years on my EON-17. Yes, it's a Clevo chassis, but they're easily serviceable, and fiercely supported. For the most part, Macbooks are cheaper than the base units of each series, and if you're looking for the less-expensive route to the same thing, go with Sager - Sager is the unaffiliated,"drop-ship the hardware" Clevo rebadger, and Origin is more the "we have your back no matter what, and will custom paint your rig and install your software and test it out for you" option, with each company's pricing reflecting these respective stances. Either way, if you can deal with the weight and the less-than-stellar battery life, and you like laptops that make tinkering possible, and money isn't a consideration, then they're your answer. I don't work for them, and I don't own their stock, but I'll never buy a laptop from anyone else.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47144863)

That currently seems to be Lenovo, decent top end machines with excellent specs (though you pay through the ring for them). Asus make some high quality lightweight machines too. I would not recommend a HP laptop to anyone nowadays in any of their ranges.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap = LOSER segment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47145023)

My Lenovo X201 is pretty much 4 years old now, and still in fantastic condition. I did have to replace the CPU fan, but the bearings in a fan can go out on any model/make/manufacturer of anything, so I can't fault Lenovo on that.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 months ago | (#47143253)

You can already buy an HP laptop with Windows at this price from Walmart.

There *are* additional hardware costs (4, Informative)

tlambert (566799) | about 2 months ago | (#47143821)

ChromeOS, in contrast, comes with more stringent system requirements that would cost HP a bit more.

In other words, this thing is going to be really slow if you try to use it for serious work. Why? Because HP is cheap and doesn't want to shell out for decent components. That and/or they like their locked down bootloader.

There are additional hardware requirements on a ChromeBook:

o No COTS keyboard (ChromeOS requires a custom keyboard)

o Work required on the TP bus input lines and power to deal with wake-from-trackpad

o EC modifications for wake-from-trackpad, including some tricky PS/2 state machine work

o EC modifications including additional GPIO pins and a couple of resisters and capacitors, if the parts PS/2 bus is on the C3 power rail (i.e. there's some issues with C-state transitions if the PS/2 or I2C bus for the TP are powered down in sleep state)

o EC state machine modifications for prioritization of traffic from the keyboard matrix "pretend" i8051/i8042 parts to provide a muxed PS/2 bus with e.g. a Synaptics PS/2 trackpad; specifically, HP's EC parts tend to drop keystrokes under certain conditions, and the typical solution to the hardware problem in the EC firmware is to stop TP input for a period of time following keyboard input - same solution used by Toshiba - and it means you can't use both keyboard and mouse in games, unless you use an external mouse in place of the TP

o If the TP remains powered in sleep state, for wake-from sleep, as part of the C1 rail, then there is an associated batter cost, even if you chat with it to clock it way down; this implies either clam-shell it shut to turn off the TP, -OR- a bigger battery to achieve the same battery life. FWIW, that also means that the C1 line to the TP power has to be gated by *another* GPIO line from the EC

o Wake-from-trackpad also has some implications for BIOS default state on initial boot or wake-from-sleep (C1->C3 state transition); most BIOS are broken in this regard (hint: try holding the TP click down when booting some time, and see how long it takes).

o A TPM to implement the "trusted boot" in a way that it can't be worked around in software (Microsoft Trusted Boot can work without TPM hardware, but can be worked around in software if you are diligent).

o There's a known defect in I2C bus sharing on some TPMs when doing back-to-back transactions, which means that they tend to demand their own I2C bus.

o The last HP ChromeBook was withdrawn from the market due to power supply overheating problem (this is public information), which had to do with the charging circuit and the power draw in sleep state, while leaving certain peripherals powered on that aren't on in a normal Windows sleep state.

o CoreBoot and u-boot for the BIOS (technically, you could flash both and select which one in a setup screen, but that means higher NVRAM costs for the storage of the BIOS)

So... a lot of software work in a sensitive system area, a potentially larger battery, a potentially higher per unit cost for the keyboard, a potentially higher per unit cost for the TP, a modified BIOS and other BIOS costs, and a TPM and maybe an extra I2C line, plus a potential mod to the charging circuit.

Full disclosure: I did the EC state machine work and worked with Synaptics and Samsung on the EC and hardware modifications for a number of TP and keyboard issues, as well as other of the above issues, for ChromeBooks from Samsung, Acer, and other companies while part of the ChromeOS team at Google. Basically, they'd need to make my recommended list of partner modifications to their hardware and firmware in order to build a successful ChromeBook.

I suspect that they will find the android OS not very satisfactory as well, but with a standard keyboard and other features, they can use COTS parts for most things, and pop the rip cord and switch to Windows on the thing if they absolutely had to do so.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap (0)

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Re:HP Is Being Cheap (1)

luther349 (645380) | about 2 months ago | (#47145353)

yet we have 200$ chromebooks.

Re:HP Is Being Cheap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47145363)

No, you want "decent components" you buy a faster box.

You want cheap you buy this. HP are giving you OPTIONS you have to select the one that is right for you.

Tegra? 4 Lbs? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142213)

I'm sorry a Tegra processor in a machine almost 4 Lbs? That is ridiculous. A tablet sized processor in a notebook sized body. Nobody will be foolish enough to buy that. Maybe a 1.2 pound machine with such low specs. I guess they will go on a fire sale like the silly web os machines they sold a couple of years back.

Re:Tegra? 4 Lbs? (1)

hodagacz (948570) | about 2 months ago | (#47142249)

Battery required for a 14" Screen I guess. I like the idea actually. Quick booting and not using ChromeOS are pluses in my book.

Re:Tegra? 4 Lbs? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142743)

Battery required for a 14" Screen I guess.

My MacBook Air says otherwise.

(I know Apple has some patents on great battery tech, so yea that's maybe unfair, but it does set the standard for me now. Under one pound will impress me, unless this laptop has an 8 day battery or also makes toast or something.)

Re:Tegra? 4 Lbs? (3, Interesting)

JabberWokky (19442) | about 2 months ago | (#47143931)

I doubt it is just the patents. Add in the price point and the fact that this is a relatively minor product, so there are no fancy retooled factories and a minimum of custom components are going into this, as opposed to in a flagship product. Plus a dozen other little issues that fall under those or add to them. It's basically using cheap components for a cheap price point. The Air uses the absolute latest and best to get to the minimum weight and size, but at a high price point. Sony did that for years as well, and had a similarly high price point relative to the general market of the time.

It is quite a bit underwhelming compared to even higher end Android tablets like the $650 Galaxy Note 12, but the killer feature is probably intended to be what will likely be a $300 and change street price with the ease of Android (for those who already have an Android phone). It's comparable to their Pavillion 14" laptop: http://www.amazon.com//dp/B00B... [amazon.com]

Noooo! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142253)

You won't kill my dreams HP!

The first android on my lap top must be Cherry 2000!

Product definition, they're doing it wrong (1)

Zigurd (3528) | about 2 months ago | (#47142265)

> Android is "a lot cheaper for HP to implement in a laptop; ChromeOS, in contrast, comes with more stringent system requirements that would cost HP a bit more."

It looks like sweet hardware. They may have good intentions re costs. But that's not how to define a product. The laptop form factor works against the touch interface by putting the screen just a little too far away. It also completely destroys the ability to hold a device like a sheaf of paper or clipboard.

The other side of the coin is that a browser-based UI is well-suited to using a pointing device instead of (or in addition to) touch.

Could have been a great Chromebook.

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142333)

Why didn't they just make a fat 'slate' with a bundled micro USB plug keyboard 'dock'? It's the obvious engineering solution for having both a slate and a laptop style keyboard.

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47142381)

A chrombook, or anything for that matter running ChromOS, only works if you have internet access.
Most labtops not even support cellular commections.
Considering that the world is slightly bigger than the USA, I would say most people buying a laptop travel very often outside of their country, hence: they habe no internet connection during traveling (regardless if it is a car, a train or a plane they use). They only have internet in the hotel lobby (wifi/wlan) or very often have to pay premium prices to even get wifi/wlan in a hotel.
I for my par want to use my computer during a flight or train travel. And I don't see that a semi usefull half ass web application will ever be my main productivity tool.
Yes, I wrote computer, as I want a computer, not an electronic gadget only usefull under certain circumstances that are out of my control.

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about 2 months ago | (#47142805)

Thats false. All apps and data can be cached locally, and sync whenever you do get a connexion. An off-line Chromebook is fully functional.

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47143785)

How much data can it cach?
Sorry, I doubt this.
Why the heck would it be marketed as an internet OS/notebokk if it is that easy?
Why not market it as a 'normal' laptop with optional 'cloud synching'?

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (2)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 2 months ago | (#47144409)

How much data can it cach? Sorry, I doubt this. Why the heck would it be marketed as an internet OS/notebokk if it is that easy? Why not market it as a 'normal' laptop with optional 'cloud synching'?

I have one. You can doubt that it runs off the network, but that is just plain wrong.

The Chromebook uses a browser based operating system. It also uses "the Cloud" for a lot of storage. But you hit the power button, and in a couple seconds, it will ask you to log on, and internet connection or not, it's working.

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (2)

cmdr_tofu (826352) | about 2 months ago | (#47142831)

Umm I have a (sub-$150) Chromebook and it runs Xubuntu just fine. Also ChromeOS sans-Internet is handy for reading and playing audiobooks (I bookmark them so I don't have to switch OS's and type xine) while I'm driving. The 9ish hourish battery life makes it fine for most drives and I don't need to plug it in.

I think there is some kind of offline Officelike package but I haven't tried it. LibreOffice works under Ubuntu. I have all my favorite dev-tools and slashem installed on mine, so it is perfectly appropriate for a train or plane as well.

I'm not telling you that a chromebook is the best device for you, but if you are saying that the device can only be used with Internet access, you are incorrect. On the Acer Chromebooks, you can even get Windows to run.

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47143769)

I was talking about ChromeOS, not about a chrome book running a linux derivate. But thanx for the info, it is cebrtainly interesting!

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (1)

bmcage (785177) | about 2 months ago | (#47145503)

The linux runs in a chroot inside ChromeOS. So, you use a tab of the browser to start your linux, then use the F keys to switch to it, and back. In other words, you need to see linux as an application you run inside ChromeOS, not as a different installed OS. Files are stored in the Downloads folder, and go to your google drive like that via the ChromeOS file manager. See https://github.com/dnschneid/c... [github.com]

Re:Product definition, they're doing it wrong (2)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 2 months ago | (#47144395)

Could have been a great Chromebook.

Yes. Having bought a Chromebook as an experiment when Best Buy was giving out tradeins on old XP laptops, I was all ready to learn about all it's deficiencies.

But after spending the 99 dollars, I was really pleasantly surprised. Faster than my Wife's W8 laptop that cost 8x as much, almost instant booting, and they've made it easier to work offline now. Chromebooks are now what I recommend to peopel for "Grandma's computer".

But for my serious side, I dual boot it with ChrUbuntu, and I have a fully functioning Linux computer for my 99 dollars.

Life is good. And Windows free.

$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (3, Interesting)

corychristison (951993) | about 2 months ago | (#47142295)

In Nov/2012 I bought an HP 15.6" AMD based laptop (notebook?) with 8GB DDR3 RAM, 500GB HDD, USB3, Win7 Home Premium, and Beats Audio for $399.00 Canadian. This was retail price.

Upon purchase, I wiped and installed Funtoo Linux, and have since replaced the HDD with an SSD. It does everything I need it to do. I regularly get 4.5 hours battery life of continuous use. Runs a tad warm but I don't use it on my lap so its fine.

My point is, this is android based notebook is limited as a general purpose machine, and costs more than I paid for mine a year and a half ago.

I do understand is had a touchscreen, larger battery and built in flash based memory, and that can drive costs uo a bit, but in terms of general usefulness I don't think it will fly.

$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142325)

amd what? E1 or A6?

Re: $400 ain't cheap for that hardware (1)

corychristison (951993) | about 2 months ago | (#47143127)

According to `cat /proc/cpuinfo` its an AMD A6-4455M w/ Radeon HD 7500G.

The HP model # on the bottom is Envy 6-1040ca.

Re:$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47143305)

You're aware that 15.6" laptops have always been cheaper than 14" laptops, right?

Re:$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47143415)

In Nov/2012 I bought an HP 15.6" AMD based laptop (notebook?) with 8GB DDR3 RAM, 500GB HDD, USB3, Win7 Home Premium, and Beats Audio for $399.00 Canadian. This was retail price.

Upon purchase, I wiped and installed Funtoo Linux, and have since replaced the HDD with an SSD. It does everything I need it to do. I regularly get 4.5 hours battery life of continuous use. Runs a tad warm but I don't use it on my lap so its fine.

My point is, this is android based notebook is limited as a general purpose machine, and costs more than I paid for mine a year and a half ago.

I do understand is had a touchscreen, larger battery and built in flash based memory, and that can drive costs uo a bit, but in terms of general usefulness I don't think it will fly.

Not a bad price for those specifications. I paid approximately twice as much in 2012 for an Acer with the similar specifications. I replaced Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium Edition with Ubuntu Linux 12.04 LTS and installed Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium Edition as an Oracle VirtualBox instance. However, as I move more to the "cloud" including most of my development a Chromebook would not be a bad option as long as there is an SSH client web browser extension (there is such a thing because I checked) to securely access my remote VMs. The transition back to CLI has been refreshing and nostalgic.

Re:$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47143491)

Well... you could buy this one and replace Android with an ARM compatible Linux (fx. Debian)...

Re:$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47145419)

It might not be possible.

Re:$400 ain't cheap for that hardware (1)

CrashNBrn (1143981) | about 2 months ago | (#47144875)

November last year, I got a HP 17" (non-touch), AMD A8-5550M, 8GB Ram, 640GB HD, with Windows 8, for $450. Granted the touchpad mostly sucks, and the keyboard layout is non-optimal even with the NumPad. But it was $450. I just use an external keyboard sometimes, and mouse.

If the 14" even has a SSD - and not just basic flash-ram, a 64GB SSD should be about equivalent with a 500-650GB HD. A touch screen tends to add nearly a $100 to a laptop... but with only 2GB of ram, and a standard dimension screen, I don't see how that can be worth much more than $250-$300.

Ask for NSA subsidy (3, Funny)

Greg666NYC (3665779) | about 2 months ago | (#47142305)

They will happily subsidize your hardware. Latest OS available from M$ plus free hardware evaluation and optimization on assembler level.

Re: Ask for NSA subsidy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47143227)

Haw haw haw.

Gee, I wonder what WebOs might have cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142339)

Feels like a missed oportunity to me. I guess the corporate lawyers killed it in fear of Apple. IMO.

Re: Gee, I wonder what WebOs might have cost? (2)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | about 2 months ago | (#47142505)

I think HP killed it because HP.

Finally! the Year of Linux on the Laptop (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142371)

Took long enough.

Why would I spend $400 on this? (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | about 2 months ago | (#47142377)

when I can pretty easily get a dual core i5 for $400? Or if I care about battery life a single core i3 for $299?

I can't help but wonder if these products are just HPs way of saying to Microsoft that they have alternatives to Windows.

Re:Why would I spend $400 on this? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 months ago | (#47142393)

I was about to say the same thing, and even my i5 gets 6 hours of battery if I throw it in power saver mode.

The problem I see with the whole "see Microsoft we have choices" thing is that none of then have been successful, which reinforces MS's point

To run Android apps (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 months ago | (#47142561)

One reason would involve running applications that are available for Android but not for X11/Linux.

Re:To run Android apps (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 months ago | (#47142645)

And how many of those ( that the average person actually uses ) benefit from having a permanently attached keyboard?

Re:To run Android apps (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 months ago | (#47143681)

First, define "average person". Second, Google Docs. Third, if someone already carries a laptop, the applications benefit from being able to run on the same laptop without having to run in an emulator.

Re:To run Android apps (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 months ago | (#47143969)

How about i define dimwit instead: "Tepples"

Damned idiots around here, its no wonder i rarely bother to come here anymore. Between lame stories, and total morons pretending they are functional trying to comment....

Should round you all up and send you away. Far far away. Or Soylent Green.. mmm Soylent Green..

Re:To run Android apps (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 months ago | (#47145447)

So you couldn't make a proper counter-argument and resorted to an insult instead?

Re:To run Android apps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47144349)

First, define "average person".

Whatever the target market for this device is, from what I can see it is nobody that exists.

Second, Google Docs.

One cross-platform application, well on that basis this thing should sell like hotcakes amirite?

Third, if someone already carries a laptop, the applications benefit from being able to run on the same laptop without having to run in an emulator.

Google Docs already runs on normal laptops without an emulator.

Re:Why would I spend $400 on this? (1)

guacamole (24270) | about 2 months ago | (#47145657)

You won't get a dual core i5 laptop for $400 "easily", unless you're buying a used notebook or something easily outdated. Try maybe $600. And then you end up almost certainly with the garbage 720p or 1366x768 screen.

boot loader (1)

visualight (468005) | about 2 months ago | (#47142379)

If the boot loader is not encrypted I might buy one.

HP consumer laptops horrible (1)

badzilla (50355) | about 2 months ago | (#47142407)

HP consumer laptops consistently worst in reliability tables. Why would you buy one.

http://www.engadget.com/2009/1... [engadget.com]

Re:HP consumer laptops horrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142661)

I will never buy HP notebooks, laptops or computers again, never !
Out of 5 HP notebooks, 4 died.
They fixed 1, new motherboard.
The other 3 expired a couple months after warranty, the fee would have been too much to fix.
Couple years later, I discovered there was a problem with graphics chip, I wasn't notified, had sent in all warranty cards.
Tried getting them to fix but too late.
Was in a rush to get a replacement desktop, thought I was getting a duel core, after everything was setup discovered it was single core.
Yes, should have looked into it more but from the PC description, it sure looked to be duel core.
Then there's the ink-jet printers, all designed to stop working after a number of prints, and inks all containing chips to indicate no ink when they have plenty.
Fuck HP, never again !

Re:HP consumer laptops horrible (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 2 months ago | (#47142959)

There is probably a remote kill switch on most laptops/computers, unless they are like a 386 or 286, but I've been happily chugging along on this 5W chipset+Atom cpu /7-9 hr battery HP Mini 210 with XP for 4 years now. My previous laptop, still kinda working but the screen hinge broke, HP C508US (came with Vista, yucckkk, downgraded to Win2K super good) was better, no real battery life, but you could play games like Rairoad Tycoon 2 Gold and Age of Empires Gold on it just fine, because this HP Mini is only 1024x600, can't do 768 needed by those games. Also Linux could access the soundcard on that one, on this one it's like this IDT sound chipset needs some special password before it will process sound. Remember the old BIOS days where there was a standard function, memory range, that many chipsets could adapt to, without funky secret keys and drivers? So this one is only good on XP for stuff like Emusic, but when I'm off the internet fully when DRM spreads too much and all my save buttons are taken away, I'll have to go back to the older stuff. I've been collecting older PC's, as funds become available, mostly made around Windows 2000, or at least be able to run Windows 2000 even if made in say, 2005 or 6. Windows 2000 is the last windows that could be reinstalled without activation, or special hardware check, as in it must be a dell, hp, ibm, or one of the other in with the gang companies. I'm not even trying to get used to these newer games, whatever games used to run back then, those are for good for me, 40 years from now when I'm retired, and everyone else is locked into a 2 menu option, 5 button android world. The questions that arise with this tegra and android are: can you run MS Office 2000 on it? How about PostgreSQL 8? How about Apache or similar webserver? My guess is no, no, and no. It doesn't really matter, because you'll be forced to create your office documents on the cloud, through a browser, as the ads on Slashdot even today advertise creating music on the cloud. If all businesses run their stuff on the cloud, as opposed to offline computers, then every 6 months that browsers get obsoleted they have to buy new computers, and they cannot get away with the bullshit of running a computer for 30 years, without a large and expensive IT department, and not upgrading at least twice a year, like the computer business people would like it. So what if your link to the cloud is severed from some Axis bombing? How are you gonna keep producing weapons in your factories? See with a home computer running Win2K/FL Studio 5 in a bunker basement you don't have to give a fuck if WW3 is raging outside between the Canadians and Japanese, the US with its 5th world economy by then (because we can't educate our kids) taking collateral damage, or the zombies of the apocalypse are eating each other, if you got a couple days leave as vacation you can ignore all that and compose some music at home. Not if you have a cloud based computer with the link to the cloud severed.

Re: HP consumer laptops horrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47143075)

With sentences like that, who needs paragraphs?!

Re:HP consumer laptops horrible (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47143455)

Was in a rush to get a replacement desktop, thought I was getting a duel core, after everything was setup discovered it was single core.
Yes, should have looked into it more but from the PC description, it sure looked to be duel core.

You bought duelling core processors and one of them lost the duel. So you got the computer you wanted, not the computer you expected. There is a difference.

Sounds DOA to me (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 months ago | (#47142417)

Nothing wrong with android on a phone or tablet, but a laptop? I cant see it being of much value tacking on a permanent keyboard.

People will want more functionality with a laptop than this will give. is chrome OS the right choice? I donno, but Android sure isn't.

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47142507)

So, if you think so, care to elaborate?
Why should I prefer an OS that only works with an internet connection over Android? What is wrong with Android?

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 months ago | (#47142709)

Reading comprehension issues i see.

I clearly said nothing wrong with Android by its self, just that i dont feel its appropriate for this device.

I also clearly said i wasn't sure if ChromeOS was the answer or not. And from what i gather its becoming less and less reliant on a constant connection, so your argument may be a moot point now anyway.

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47142813)

It is not reliant on a 'constant' connection, nevertheless it is an 'internet OS' ... and the time is by far not ripe for that.

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 2 months ago | (#47144435)

It is not reliant on a 'constant' connection, nevertheless it is an 'internet OS' ... and the time is by far not ripe for that.

Seriously man, what the exact fuck is your issue? Chrome OS works off-line, and since this is like the 5th post where you claim otherwise, you must have some reason to be dissembling.

Tell us of your experience with ChromeOS, and the failures of trying to get it to work offline.

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about 2 months ago | (#47142815)

ChromeOs works w/o internet connexion.

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 2 months ago | (#47143775)

In its limited 'offline mode'.
So how long can you be offline and how much work van you do in that time?
Which software development environment does it support offline?

Re:Sounds DOA to me (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about 2 months ago | (#47142829)

I've got an Android *desktop* (Minix X5), and it works surprisingly well.

The best thing is the ease of use -that does go hand-in-hand with limitations such as no multitasking-, but the Home and Back buttons work really well for non-techies; and the App selection is excellent.

Many games do have issues with the format (no touch, landscape only, lots of sensors ie gyro... lacking), but all others apps work well, and over half the games do too. Main gripe is the lack of a shortcut to zoom in/out.

offer valid till (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142511)

offer valid till old stocks last ?

It was inevitable (1)

Flytrap (939609) | about 2 months ago | (#47142517)

I guess this was inevitable... After this strategy worked for Samsung in differentiating itself from Apple's iPhone, someone was bound to try to see if the same strategy would work against the iPad.

I think that what HP missed in Samsung's game plan was that they built their G-series phones as premium devices... size alone was not enough

Selling a whole bunch of cheap devices will get one more market-share, and very little else.

iPad is a dead product walking (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 months ago | (#47142679)

... see if the same strategy would work against the iPad.

iPad was only relevant in one country, and since then even with some distribution chain *wink* stock readjustments...the market is simply leaving Apple behind, who aren't even maintaining growth in a hyper-growth market. Competing with Apple in the tablet market is just stupid...Best just to leave Microsofts Surface part III to have a go. It isn't 2013 anymore.

Re:iPad is a dead product walking (1)

PapayaSF (721268) | about 2 months ago | (#47142949)

the market is simply leaving Apple behind, who aren't even maintaining growth in a hyper-growth market.

Wrong. Tablet sales are down overall [cnet.com] , not just Apple's (though a few minor brands are up a little).

Re:iPad is a dead product walking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47144899)

I think a lot of the drop has come from the success of a lot of the hybrid devices, just like tablets displaced many laptops now hybrids are displacing tablets. People are realizing tablets are great for consuming content but there is not a whole lot else you can do with them. very light weight ultrabooks or machines with detachable keyboards offer all the benefits of the tablets while providing real utility. tablets still have a place but I would expect some significant declines in the market in the coming 1 -2 years. It would not surprise me if we see an iDevice of some sort at this years apple conference as they are realizing they picked wrong by ignoring that segment.

ChromeOS spec more stringent? (3, Interesting)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 2 months ago | (#47142537)

It does not make sense. ChromeOS is shipping with some pretty low spec, not even the 1920x1080 screen, low end processor, without touch screen, mass storage as little as 16 GB. The more recent ones do not even have Ethernet port or VGI output. Just wi-fi and HDMI out that is all. The Slatebook calls for a full HD, 14 inch screen. Possibly multitouch screen because Android spec calls for a touch screen.

May be the ChromeOS spec is more stringent, but not on the hardware side. May be ChromeOS prevents HP from loading it up with crapware and nagware. Android might allow HP to insinuate itself in the Apps and marketplace more deeply. The HP bean counters would see it as "value" and "potential revenue stream". What the PHBs never realize is, if enough people do not buy that device the revenue stream will be as dry as a wadi in the Sahara.

Re:ChromeOS spec more stringent? (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about 2 months ago | (#47142837)

It's an Apps thing. Android = lotsa apps.

Re:ChromeOS spec more stringent? (1)

flappinbooger (574405) | about 2 months ago | (#47143979)

The conspiracy minded folks will point out that this is an attempt to test the waters and introduce the intended future of computing.

TPTB want to reign in the free-for-all that is windows and even MAC-os computers. People can run anything and everything. With Android and the google store, the computer is limited to a controlled walled-garden of apps. Same for iOS.

So, if this form factor takes off (or, if it is MADE to take off, wink wink) you have Google, which is a CIA/NSA front, controlling all that the people are allowed to run on their computers.

Watch, next will be an android DESKTOP. Just you watch!

All maximized all the time (4, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | about 2 months ago | (#47142547)

My beef with trying to use Android on a desktop or laptop form factor device is this requirement in the Android Compatibility Definition Document [googleusercontent.com] : "Devices MUST NOT change their reported screen size at any time." This rules out use of any nontrivial window manager, despite that the screen of a laptop or tablet is big enough for 2 to 4 phone apps at once.

Re:All maximized all the time (1)

ThorGod (456163) | about 2 months ago | (#47142735)

Developers would need to target it...and as a developer I'm not likely to target it since it's only one android device.

Apps meant for 10" screens will probably function well enough on it, though. So it'll be useful if you've already migrated your workflow to a 10" tablet but want more screen/keyboard estate (I'm throwing out entertainment value since it's a laptop form factor)

Re:All maximized all the time (2)

Kjella (173770) | about 2 months ago | (#47143041)

Sure, but can you lie to it? It's an OS made for full screen use on cell phones, applications probably don't have the code to fit arbitrary window sizes or dynamically resize all the assets. You can probably tell the device it's rendering to a 1920x1080 display and then scale it down to 1280x720 or 960x540 or 640x360... or tell it the device has been "flipped" so it should render at 1080x1920 and then scale that down, it wouldn't be scaling as you're used to but you could have tiles of various sizes though they wouldn't be "smart" just downscales.

Re:All maximized all the time (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 months ago | (#47143945)

You can probably tell the device it's rendering to a 1920x1080 display and then scale it down to 1280x720 or 960x540 or 640x360

And need a magnifying glass to read anything.

Re:All maximized all the time (1)

jabuzz (182671) | about 2 months ago | (#47145725)

How does that square with my MHL capable Xperia Z1 compact? From what I can make out according to my TV video playback jumps to full HD...

Yoga 2 w/ Android (1)

lma (109377) | about 2 months ago | (#47142613)

I would buy a Lenovo Yoga 2 running Android. Great form factor, but crippled by Windows 8.

192*8*x1080? (2)

Hsien-Ko (1090623) | about 2 months ago | (#47142631)

What do those extra 8640 pixels do?

Re:192*8*x1080? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142737)

It's a typo. That kind of typo making it past the editor's desk for a technology news source is kind of embarrassing.

Re:192*8*x1080? (1)

timothy (36799) | about 2 months ago | (#47143487)

It might be wrong, but it's not a *typo* -- that figure is from the PC Mag article -- "(though the screen itself is a mere 1928-by-1080-pixel resolution)." ...

A slightly unusual resolution number, but by no means crazy: http://www.tweaktown.com/news/... [tweaktown.com]

If that number is wrong, would be happy to update!

timothy

A Data Mining Laptop (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47142933)

Why would anyone trust Google on a laptop.

Upgrades... no. (2)

kurkosdr (2378710) | about 2 months ago | (#47143001)

All I heard was: Heavily customized version of Android that won't see any upgrades.

Wait for Tegra K1 (2)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 2 months ago | (#47143163)

The Tegra K1 has a desktop-like GPU (similar in architecture to the GTX 780) and is supported by both nouveau and the nvidia proprietary driver, so it would be a more proper chip to run real desktop linux in addition to (or in place of) Android.

The article is wondering whether the USB is 2.0 or 3.0. Tegra 4 does not have PCI Express lines, so it's 2.0.

USB 3.0 (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 2 months ago | (#47143171)

oh sorry about that, the Tegra 4 includes USB 3.0 right on the chip.

Under 4 pounds! (1)

SourceFrog (627014) | about 2 months ago | (#47143373)

That's less than $6.71 at today's exchange rates - that is very cheap, I'll get one at that price.

Who cares? (1)

gelfling (6534) | about 2 months ago | (#47143399)

No one cares what the underlying OS is anymore, which is WHY Android exists in the first place. Another Linux based laptop? So what? And it will run Candy Crush and Angry Birds? Wow.

Why not straight Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47144067)

...as opposed to gay Linux you might ask? No, I mean a regular distro like Ubuntu/Mint as opposed to Android/ChromeOS.

The SlateBook 14 will run Android, rather than Windows (or ChromeOS, for that matter), which helps keep it relatively cheap, at $400.

If keeping things cheap by not purchasing a Windows license is a factor in this device, why not slap on something like Ubuntu or Mint? It'd cost the same but provide greater utility in the form of proper "fat" applications and increased power and capability from a regular OS as opposed to a cloud-focused or touch-focused system.

Honestly, a Linux distro on a laptop has about as much chance of working as Android on a laptop. It'd be hard enough to sell in the first place so why not go for broke?

Re:Why not straight Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47145739)

As Joe Public knows little about Linux.

Android however is the thing that "just works" on their phone and table.

Plus it has Angry Birds (dated reference now I know) does Ubuntu have that?

Android actually works pretty well on laptops (1)

MilenCent (219397) | about 2 months ago | (#47144573)

I've been using Android x86 for a while on an old spare laptop and, generally speaking, it's worked pretty well! Surprisingly many Android games don't seem to like it (swipe gestures don't seem to map well to a mouse), and apps that rely on portrait orientation are annoying, but for general web browsing it's been fine.

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