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BlackBerry Back In Profit

Soulskill posted about 4 months ago | from the bouncing-back dept.

Blackberry 67

An anonymous reader sends word that BlackBerry, hit hard over the past several years by the emergence of smart phones, has come back to profitability. BlackBerry has been fighting an uphill battle to stay relevant in the world of mobile devices. It has lost market share to Apple, companies like Samsung that offer gadgets running on Google's Android operating system, and Microsoft. But John Chen, who took over as CEO in November, has injected new life to the company. Chen, who says BlackBerry is getting close to breaking even on its hardware business, has steered the company's focus more towards software. He's made several product announcements that Wall Street has cheered. Last month, the company launched its Project Ion, an initiative to develop more connected devices ... a trend dubbed the Internet of Things. On Wednesday, BlackBerry reached a deal with Amazon that will let users of BlackBerry's newest operating system access Android apps in Amazon's appstore later this fall.

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Human anus (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289661)

Human anus [wikipedia.org]

Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (4, Insightful)

Animats (122034) | about 4 months ago | (#47289663)

Blackberry may make a comeback as the "big business smartphone". All the other smartphones are slaves to Apple or Google or a carrier. Blackberry phones are slaves to the enterprise Blackberry server, and Blackberry itself doesn't see phone traffic. Blackberry is the only major vendor serious about security and encryption. Everybody else is into advertising revenue.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (1)

beefoot (2250164) | about 4 months ago | (#47289709)

> Blackberry is the only major vendor serious about security and encryption.

They are serious about security or compression? I think it was latter. Compression was necessary to minimize data usage. Back in the days where GPRS was considered extremely FAST. They needed compression to make communication on their device bearable. I think security was an after thought. Just my opinion.

Having said that, a BB10 is not much different comparing to other smart phones in term of how it is retrieving webpages, emails, etc.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289807)

You should do more research on this. Your statements are not entirely accurate.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (1)

Tapewolf (1639955) | about 4 months ago | (#47289833)

Certainly they were - the old Blackberry OS was FIPS-certified. At the time, about 3 years ago, it was the only phone platform we could find that matched the government security requirements the company I worked for needed for a tender, and that was unfortunate, because the old OS is shit and horrific to program against.

I do not know if the QNX-based OS was ever secured as tightly as OS7.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47292661)

QNX is actually a more secure OS by design and proper practices. It is also easier to program with ... rather than program against too

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47295463)

Opinions are like assholes.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 months ago | (#47289875)

It's better than some of their prospects; but I wouldn't be wildly optimistic.

Neither iDevices nor androids have the FIPS-certified seriousness of the classic blackberries; but both have been receiving their share of attention from vendors interested in (either at the level of a single app that speaks EAS and refuses to talk to system-wide storage of contacts and other information that would normally bleed the first time somebody downloaded the SpamSocial app of the day, or on the level of 'MDM' stuff that puts the entire phone under IT's benevolent administration) making them more amenable to the needs of business customers.

At the same time, Blackberry hasn't shown any particularly clever strategy for maintaining privacy and security once they try to add those features that helped the other smartphones murder them in the first place. BIS, for anyone not looking to run a BES in house, possessed essentially no virtues whatsoever, security or otherwise, and the only thing that kept the 'App world' from being the same roiling shit sandwich of advertising surveillance, applications that are little more than upload utilities to ill-secured 3rd party services, and so on, was the fact that it is effectively empty.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

MikeMo (521697) | about 4 months ago | (#47290083)

Sorry, Apple is not into advertising revenue. They make their money on hardware and software and services. They don't have a search web site.

Selling your eyeballs and your habits are pretty strictly in Google's and Microsoft's purview.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (2)

kqs (1038910) | about 4 months ago | (#47290515)

Selling your eyeballs and your habits are pretty strictly in Google's and Microsoft's purview.

Yeah, not so much. [apple.com] Though based on news reports they're not not very good at it [macrumors.com] yet.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (2)

harperska (1376103) | about 5 months ago | (#47290615)

iAd is the coolest, most advanced advertising delivery platform not used by anybody.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 5 months ago | (#47291933)

Selling your eyeballs and your habits are pretty strictly in Google's and Microsoft's purview.

Yeah, not so much. Though based on news reports they're not not very good at it yet.

iAds? They're a joke. First, Apple doesn't give out customer information - at least not to the extent the competition (i.e., Google/AdMob) does. And the exorbitant buy in fee?

To be honest, I think the ONLY reason Apple has iAds is because Google is paying Apple off. Remember when the DoJ was investigating Google's purchase of AdMob? What did they see as "competition"? Yes, iAds.

Now, given AdMob's practically 99% marketshare (they do web, app, etc advertising on Android, iOS, Windows Phone, ...) versus iAds practically nil marketshare (and only on iOS),

I can't even see iAds being a significant revenue source for Apple, and Apple's killed projects that did more. (To be honest, the only iAds I see are ads about... iAds)

Steve Jobs introduced iAds to the world back in 2010 as part of the iOS 5 or something release. I don't know about you, but 4 years later, there's no business reason to have it. Sure, NIH, maybe, but given its rather pathetic performance (Apple's letting devs use it to advertise their apps too, now, and yet I don't see it happening), you'd think Apple would shutter it. The fact they're not probably indicates a backrrom deal. Probably Google pays Apple enough money to keep it running as part of the whole Google default payment.

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47295467)

You forget about the CarrierIQ scandal? Only because they were caught.

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290171)

Right. Super serious about security, enough to give the decryption keys to any country that asks. I feel very safe knowing the Indian and Saudi governments can read any of my messages.

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (0)

msobkow (48369) | about 4 months ago | (#47290469)

Oh, yes. Companies like Blackberry, Apple, Microsoft, et. al. should all be "digital anarchists" and rebel against the governments of the countries they sell products and services in because you say so.

How about you put your ass on the line against those governments?

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 4 months ago | (#47290481)

BTW, that happens to include "friendly" governments like those of the UK, US, Canada, and Australia.

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 5 months ago | (#47298013)

Right. Super serious about security, enough to give the decryption keys to any country that asks. I feel very safe knowing the Indian and Saudi governments can read any of my messages.

Actually, they can't read all messages. Even RIM can't read all messages.

There are two modes a Blackberry can work in - BES mode and BIS mode. BES mode is when your Blackberry is attached to a Blackberry Enterprise Server machine. What happens in this case is all traffic between your phone and BES is encrypted with a per-device key known only to BES and your phone. While your phone forwards traffic to RIM (or a country server), that traffic is encrypted using that key, and no one handling the traffic between your phone and BES can see it. Basically your phone sends data to RIM, and RIM forwards it onto your BES server, but RIM cannot see the traffic as the keys are held by BES and the phone.

In BIS mode (Blackberry Internet Service, I think) which is the "consumer" mode of operation, RIM etc., hold the keys. Your traffic is encrypted by the phone and decrypted by RIM before being sent on the general Internet (unencypted). The only people who cannot see the traffic is the carriers and gateways between the carrier and RIM.

The country servers that do the decryption can decrypt in this mode as well, for obvious reasons.

It's a fairly secure setup, as long as you're attached to BES. The phones you buy from a carrier and you enter your POP or IMAP information into? Not so much.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290223)

Blackberry has agreed to help companies like Good and Mobile Iron to help Blackberries become compatible with their software. The blackberry devices themselves are slaves now, but for the few people who can't break the habit, they might still be able to keep their blackberry without BES.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

citizenr (871508) | about 4 months ago | (#47290329)

They are so serious they let UAE/India/Saudi Arabia etc snoop on BB traffic.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (1, Interesting)

ArhcAngel (247594) | about 5 months ago | (#47290877)

They are so serious they were the last company in telecom to let UAE/India/Saudi Arabia etc snoop on BB traffic.

FTFY

The only reason you heard about BlackBerry caving was because they fought it for 3 years. All the other carriers and OEM's had already capitulated or were so insecure India didn't even have to ask. So yea...they care about the security of their customers. And FYI that was only for BIS traffic. They designed BES specifically to prevent anyone, even BlackBerry, from compromising their security.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47291049)

> Blackberry phones are slaves to the enterprise Blackberry server

Wrong. My everyday phone is a BlackBerry Z-10, and it doesn't require BES or BIS at all in order to function.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47291217)

well, they were the only one that has backdoors certified and approved for use by the president.

Re:Blackberry - only vendor serious about security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47293649)

Although Apple might be moving in that direction. iOS 8 added a nice privacy enhancing features that you don't find in BlackBerry. http://qz.com/218437/a-tiny-technical-change-in-ios-8-could-stop-marketers-spying-on-you/

Android if anything is getting worse.

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47295485)

This means nothing, they can see your actual mac address once it connects to an AP.

Re: Blackberry - only vendor serious about securit (1)

Pamela@PuppyPaws (3287329) | about 5 months ago | (#47294111)

Of course they're back to profitable. They fired everyone in customer support.

Bogus turn around. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289669)

The CEO cut his way to profitability [google.com] . Its an old cheap trick that usually helps only the CEO's bonuses/compensation and in the meantime, hurts the company's long term prospects.

The deal with Amazon? Pfft. BFD.

RIM/Blackberry will be back in the red by year end.

RIM is mostly dead and even Miracle Max can't help them.

Re:Bogus turn around. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289927)

I'm sure that, next quarter, Blackberry will be back in the red. However that doesn't make this a false demonstration. The CEO has proven that, underlying Blackberry, there is a real profitable business which is swamped by development costs. The mobile phone industry is still growing year on year. Eventually those development costs will be spread over enough phones to be fully covered. This contrasts, for example, with the situation Nokia had when they gave up where evey phone sold increased their losses.

Blackberry is not in the clear, but they have shown that they are clearly the third (marginally) profitable, sustainable system (after iOS and Android) at just the time when a real competitor (FireOS) might threaten them. That really counts for something and the makers of rival systems such as Tizen will be seriously disappointed.

Re:Bogus turn around. (1)

harperska (1376103) | about 5 months ago | (#47290777)

The CEO has proven that, underlying Blackberry, there is a real profitable business which is swamped by development costs.

Not necessarily. It depends on what it is that was cut. The problem with cost-cutting and downsizing to get into the black is that it is hard as an outsider to tell the difference between cutting genuinely unnecessary overhead and gutting the organization. If the cuts are just general downsizing, any appearance of increasing profitability is temporary and illusory. A useful oversimplification is that you essentially spend money now to make a product you sell tomorrow, whether it's in R&D now for products to be made in the future, or just the time it takes a product to move through the supply chain. So it is possible that the cuts are making them look profitable because they are currently selling what they made yesterday with yesterday's level of spending, while shooting themselves in the foot by eliminating the means to make something to sell tomorrow.

Re:Bogus turn around. (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 5 months ago | (#47291273)

They are doing the "sell the properties we own/lease them back so we can continue to do business" thing for another short-term cash injection...

Outside of North America (2)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 4 months ago | (#47289697)

I recently got back from a trip to Latin America. Blackerries were *everywhere,* with everyone BBMing like mad. iPhones were almost non-existent, with a smattering of older Android devices. I think we tend to take an America / Western Europe approach when in fact it's apparent that BB remains strong in 'emerging' markets.

Re:Outside of North America (1)

beefoot (2250164) | about 4 months ago | (#47289713)

BB was strong in Indonesia. It is just a matter of time before others catching up with the rest of the world. I believe they may survive if they focus on businesses and governments customers.

Are they new? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289727)

Were those BBs new? Or were they referbs or hand me downs - like the clothing that ends up down there from all those clothing drives by charities that just won't stop leaving those bags on my porch.

Re:Outside of North America (3, Insightful)

Stormwatch (703920) | about 4 months ago | (#47289801)

That was not Brazil, I assume. I've only seen a Blackberry here once, in some in-store kiosk, years before smartphones became mainstream. Nowadays, everyone has Androids, iPhones, even WP, while Blackberry has vanished.

Re:Outside of North America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290009)

Funny how he uses "Latin America". Why is it some secret to which country he went? Oh yes, he says that in order to make it sound like Blackberry is popular in all of Latin America.

Re:Outside of North America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290187)

> Funny how he uses "Latin America". Why is it some secret to which country he went?

Because he went to more than one country, duh! You fucking conspiracy theorists are all about picking the most convoluted explanation instead of the most obvious one. You are so smart you are dumb.

Re:Outside of North America (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 months ago | (#47289911)

The trouble with 'emerging' markets is that they aren't a strong position, even if you are the strongest player in them.

If they do manage to be 'emerging' in the sense of actually getting wealthier over time, you'd better have a compelling reason why they should continue buying from you, rather than starting to buy the toys that they couldn't previously afford, which (barring some significant cultural variable) is a very real possibility in Blackberry's case since those toys have already demonstrated the ability to burn them out of the developed world pretty dramatically.

If they are 'emerging' only in the euphemistic sense that they aren't actively decaying and do have more disposable income than subsistence mud farmers, you are in the less than enviable position of competing on price for customers who don't have much money. Best case, you remain king of a relatively small pie. Worst case, some anonymous android ODM's lowest-spec device undercuts you and your customers have very limited ability to pay a premium for your products, even if they actually like you.

Re:Outside of North America (1)

jonbryce (703250) | about 4 months ago | (#47289987)

The school kids on my bus in the morning used to spend their journeys using BBM on their blackberries. Now they have cheap Androids and converse on WhatsApp.

Re:Outside of North America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290077)

Yes, poorer nations lag behind wealthier ones when acquiring the latest technology gadgets.

Terrific insight. Just terrific.

Re:Outside of North America (1)

puto (533470) | about 5 months ago | (#47292079)

Really? In Colombia Blackberries are going the way of the dodo. Cheap androids, iphones, and windows mobiles are the norm. The only people you really see with blackberries are people who have bought them off of Mercado Libre. A big clue in all of latin america is that I would say 80 percent of the people who have a blackberry have it for show and do not have a data plan, and just use them for plain text. I would also say this goes for Peru, Ecuador, Chile, and Argentina. Even when I was working between those countries in 2010-2011 blackberries were dropping in share. You also have to realize that people in Latin America will keep an iphone or an android in one pocket, and a blackberry or cheap phone in the other. They only haul out the expensive one when they are relatively safe.

Only keyboard smartphone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289885)

Look at all the smartphones you see nowadays. The last popular Android smartphone I saw that had a keyboard was a Droid 4 -- the rest have followed the Apple cult ideology of "thinner is better."

I doubt touchscreen only BlackBerrys do/would sell well.

Re:Only keyboard smartphone (4, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | about 4 months ago | (#47289929)

...and that's not necessarily a bad thing. I can still type significantly faster on a physical Blackberry keyboard than I can on any virtual keyboard. Back when I was carrying Blackberry, the difference between the BB and the touch-only devices seemed to be similar to the difference between a laptop and a tablet. The former is for content creation. The latter is for content consumption.

Re:Only keyboard smartphone (1)

harperska (1376103) | about 5 months ago | (#47290891)

Except for all of the content creation that is happening on iPads. There is a lot of content outside of what is best made with a physical qwerty keyboard. It might not be a majority in any field, but it is certainly far from nonexistent and not as simple as the black and white dichotomy sound byte people like to repeat.

Re:Only keyboard smartphone (1)

Collective 0-0009 (1294662) | about 5 months ago | (#47291433)

I have personally witnessed "content creation" once on an iPad. Just once, so far in their existance.

And you know what... the "sales engineer" looked like a complete retard typing on the thing. Couldn't believe he worked in a development shop because it was like watching a car mechanic type up your invoice details after some repairs; painful. I really wanted to hand him my laptop and ask him to switch to it.

There may be some content being created on tablets, but by and far, it is used for consumption. We have a long way to go before there is going to be vast content created from a tablet (note that a tablet with a kickstand and keyboard don't count). So chastising isn't in order.

Re:Only keyboard smartphone (2)

harperska (1376103) | about 5 months ago | (#47291687)

That's why I said "outside of what is best made with a qwerty keyboard". I am not arguing that the iPad is just fine for all content creation. Not all content is typed, and I specifically excluded typing for a reason. For example, I have heard a lot of musical people are performing and composing with iPad apps. In fact, composing on the go can be easier on an iPad than on a laptop, as a qwerty keyboard is definitely not optimized for musical note input whereas an iPad app can display a piano keyboard for input just as easily.

Re:Only keyboard smartphone (1)

david_thornley (598059) | about 5 months ago | (#47298729)

The majority of the iPads I see have physical keyboards. I doubt they're as good as my desktop keyboard, but they're a lot more portable.

Re:Only keyboard smartphone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47291127)

...and that's not necessarily a bad thing. I can still type significantly faster on a physical Blackberry keyboard than I can on any virtual keyboard. Back when I was carrying Blackberry, the difference between the BB and the touch-only devices seemed to be similar to the difference between a laptop and a tablet. The former is for content creation. The latter is for content consumption.

Have you tried Swype(tm)? I find it particularly faster than the Blackberry keypad. I can fly down the freeway and text with one thumb without distraction leaving my other hand free to do other stuff.

If only financial engineering was a viable product (1)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about 4 months ago | (#47289915)

Does anyone really think Blackberry has any chance of long-term survival in its current form? A true turnaround can't occur if your revenues are in death spiral and businesses avoid you like a leper.

Re:If only financial engineering was a viable prod (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290269)

Blackberry sales actually went up this quarter. Revenue was only down a few million from last quarter which is absolutely great considering they have been consistently been losing 20% revenue every quarter.

They're still king in enterprises. Guaranteed, they are now facing competition in the enterprise space but handsets represent the majority of their losses. John Chen is now using foxconn to offset inventory risk. He's a business man and knows exactly what he's doing whereas you sound like you have no idea. I think maybe you should actually look into their upcoming products and software instead of spouting off FUD spread by the media.

And finally, what financial engineering are you talking about? Maybe it's the spending of money in the right areas (nanthealth, android app compatibility) and cutting them in the places (destitute app store, handset inventory) that have been making none. Sounds like a good CEO to me.

Re:If only financial engineering was a viable prod (1)

asifyoucare (302582) | about 5 months ago | (#47291721)

Yes, they're a chance if they start marketing properly. They have a very strong security message for corporates, and that message is only getting stronger post-Snowden.

For corporate (not private) use, BB is the most secure phone/e-mail platform, and that's gotta be worth a lot when phones of at least two national leaders are getting hacked. For non-corporate use, they're not secure because they allow governments of India, at least, to spy on their customers.

If senior executives travel to (say) China, they'd have to be idiots to prefer iPhone or Android to BB. They should know they'll be spied on and they should know that the Chinese (and others) have no qualms using whatever information they can get for commercial gain.

This is the message they should be pushing.

Blackberry will probably be my next phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47289923)

I used Blackberries for a while for work, but last last smart phone purchase was an Android. It's a great mini computer, very flexible and handy to have. However, Android sucks at being a phone. I've tried several Android phones and they are all terrible for typing, making calls, accepting calls, dealign with touch-tone situations.... I want my smart phone to be a phone first and mobile computer second. This is an area where Blackberry seems well suited. Blackberries, especially ones with physical keyboards, are nicer to type on, handle making/receiving calls better and are more security focused. For these reasons I will probably go back to BB when my current Android phone hits its end of contract.

Re:Blackberry will probably be my next phone (1)

urbanriot (924981) | about 4 months ago | (#47290197)

You referred to many aspects of a phone that everyone seems to ignore. I despise calling some of my Android using friends as the call quality on their end is absolute crap, while people can't discern whether I'm on a land line or mobile when they speak to me on my Blackberry Bold or my iPhone 5. I'm sure there are Android phones that have excellent clarity but it seems most people forget about what I consider to be the most important criteria when purchasing a phone. Blackberry has never failed me in that category.

Re:Blackberry will probably be my next phone (1)

harperska (1376103) | about 5 months ago | (#47290907)

Do your Android using friends have high end models like whatever the latest Samsung Galaxy is? Because Android has become the favorite OS for low-end crapphones foisted on people who would have opted for a simple flip phone but are forced into buying a smartphone because nobody makes flip phones anymore. I would not be surprised if those phones sound like crap, but it would be odd if flagship Android phones had poor call quality as well.

Re: Blackberry will probably be my next phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47291237)

Samsung has been NOTORIOUS for putting the worst cheap crap microphones into even their flagship phones for years. Only Apple and Motorola and Blackberry consistently put high quality mics in their handsets and care about outgoing call quality. The electronics and compression codecs for the mouthpiece are crap as well.

Re:Blackberry will probably be my next phone (1)

graphius (907855) | about 5 months ago | (#47291391)

I would say the exact opposite.

My personal phone is a nexus 5. I was given a blackberry z-10 as a work phone. In almost every way I prefer the Android. Better keyboard, better predective text. better sound quality, better screen, better camera...

I do like the blackberry hub, and in some ways I like the Blackberry approach to email.

In summary, I would say the Blackberry is a decent communication device and a crappy pocket computer. The Nexus 5 is an excellent pocket computer and a decent communication device.

He should be driving the Tony Stark Audi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290035)

and not the Boxster, with the top down, and on his BB phone, on the freeway

Blame Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290137)


Canada's new IT department (Shared Services Canada) has mandated BlackBerry-Only. So even though companies across the world are saving billions with promoting BYOD, SSC has gone back to the early 2000's.

Re:Blame Canada (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47290209)

BYOD is a disaster from a security standpoint. Shared Services made the correct choice.

Re:Blame Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47290617)

Nonsense. You can apply policies to iOS devices just as you can to Blackberry devices. Rumour is they are considering iOS with apps such as Divide for central management as well.

Re:Blame Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47325485)

Nonsense. You can apply policies to iOS devices just as you can to Blackberry devices. Rumour is they are considering iOS with apps such as Divide for central management as well.

TRANSEC Policies will NEVER allow (at this time anyways) secure information to be exchanged on a non-controlled/issued DND/Government asset that does not meet or exceed encryption and security requirements.

I find it laughable to believe iPhone or Android hardware and software isn't exploitable to trust with any sort of information that is deemed to be "secure".

Ive never heard of any BlackBerry device being compromised. I could be wrong mind you.

If you are SSC, perhaps you should research the BlackBerry SOP for SSC/DND and understand the consequence of BYOD on secure infrastructure.

Re:Blame Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47325373)

Canada's new IT department (Shared Services Canada) has mandated BlackBerry-Only. So even though companies across the world are saving billions with promoting BYOD, SSC has gone back to the early 2000's.

Policies have been established along with device management. Say if DND allowed BYOD, it would be a clusterfuck since every officer would want something unique per device.

As well, keeping the same continuity for the support staff (Help Desk plebs) would be next to impossible. Device software/OS's will act differently and cause issues when they cant not connect to the BES or open a document/attachment.

Further more, who the hell would pay for the device if it was lost/stolen, or damaged? I doubt DND or any other Federal ministry would flip the bill.

TRANSEC policies would probably require the device to be physically destroyed if compromised/lost and recovered.

BYOD is fine if your a mom & pop organization with very little to lose if a device is lost or compromised and want or need the convenience of a single device.

Curious definition of "Profit" (1)

gavron (1300111) | about 4 months ago | (#47290207)

The slashdot headline says "..Back in Profit." Unfortunately not so.

The original article is informative. Under Chen's leadership Blackberry has
increased their profitability so they are no longer losing so much money.

They are, however, NOT PROFITABLE. Their loss prior to some accounting
tricks (that will make the number worse) is $0.11/shr. That means an
investor holding 1000 shares just lost $110 (if he/she sold them).

While profitability as a measure of how well a company performs is good,
and acknowledging that LOSING MILLIONS is a lot better than LOSING
HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS (see e.g. Radio Shack)... Blackberry has a
long long way to go.

The article ends with the two avenues Blackberry is pursuing: hardware and
software (how inventive, right?)
- Hardware: they're going to try and create Internet enabled gadgets. As
Blackberry's core hardware competence has always been its bundled
business services this is a big departure. They fight uphill against
Samsung watches, Apple gizmos, Google's Nest, etc.
- Sofware: They bought the right to allow their product to access the
Amazon Play Store (android apps from Amazon only). The win here
is they prove their product REALLY CAN run android apps. The lose
is that instead of opening it up to the Google Play store (most
android apps) they've allowed a limited (by Amazon) subset of apps,
and most designed to siphon extra $$$ and hand them off to Amazon.
This is something we can expect to see Amazon touting as a win in
it's 10Q.

I wish them well. I was surprised by the headline. BlackBerry is
doing well to reduce loss, and less loss is higher profitability, but
they're still chewing threw their cash and unless they stem and
correct that they will be gone.

E

Re: Curious definition of "Profit" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47290775)

What are you talking about? I stopped reading after your earnings per share comment. EPS is merely a simple measurement of revenue over outstanding shares, it has no direct relationship to the buy and sell price of a stock beyond one factor of many that investors use to buy or sell. Blackberry went up around 17% percent since their earnings report.
 

Don't need Amazon appstore; BB can access Google's (3, Informative)

Prune (557140) | about 4 months ago | (#47290247)

Just use Snap to get full access to Google's Android app store. It's unofficial, but works great. Not all Android apps work, but plenty do. http://redlightoflove.com/snap... [redlightoflove.com]

That's unpossible (1)

kuhnto (1904624) | about 5 months ago | (#47290821)

That's unpossible

"more profitable" doesn't mean "making a profit" (3, Insightful)

gavron (1300111) | about 5 months ago | (#47291917)

The slashdot headline says "..Back in Profit." Unfortunately not so.

The original article is informative. Under Chen's leadership Blackberry has
increased their profitability so they are no longer losing so much money.

They are, however, NOT PROFITABLE. Their loss prior to some accounting
tricks (that will make the number worse) is $0.11/shr. That means an
investor holding 1000 shares just lost $110 (if he/she sold them).

While profitability as a measure of how well a company performs is good,
and acknowledging that LOSING MILLIONS is a lot better than LOSING
HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS (see e.g. Radio Shack)... Blackberry has a
long long way to go.

The article ends with the two avenues Blackberry is pursuing: hardware and
software (how inventive, right?)
- Hardware: they're going to try and create Internet enabled gadgets. As
Blackberry's core hardware competence has always been its bundled
business services this is a big departure. They fight uphill against
Samsung watches, Apple gizmos, Google's Nest, etc.
- Sofware: They bought the right to allow their product to access the
Amazon Play Store (android apps from Amazon only). The win here
is they prove their product REALLY CAN run android apps. The lose
is that instead of opening it up to the Google Play store (most
android apps) they've allowed a limited (by Amazon) subset of apps,
and most designed to siphon extra $$$ and hand them off to Amazon.
This is something we can expect to see Amazon touting as a win in
it's 10Q.

I wish them well. I was surprised by the headline. BlackBerry is
doing well to reduce loss, and less loss is higher profitability, but
they're still chewing threw their cash and unless they stem and
correct that they will be gone.

E

Blackberry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47293531)

haven't heard much about them since the Iphone and Samsung smartphones came out. was wondering what happend to Blackberry. thanks for posting the news.

Dead company walking (1)

Cute Fuzzy Bunny (2234232) | about 5 months ago | (#47293883)

Selling phones below cost and major cost cutting doesn't turn into a positive long term trend. It just gets the CEO paid well for a while, nice golden parachute and lines them up for a job with a company that actually has a chance of surviving.

I like blackberry. Good solid hardware. The OS is far better than ios or android, at least until recently. The security is excellent.

But they rested on their laurels too long and everything they're doing now is too little, too late. I'm sure that certain verticals will keep using their stuff for a while, but the world has moved on.

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